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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

The f(x) and dx notations represent what in Riemann sums?

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i;m not clear on what you're asking...

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    how is this even possible .......this is crazy!!!!

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Are you doing integration?

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    F(x) is a function in terms of x, and dx is the derivative. Riemann sums are simply rectangles under a curve if you find them from the left, and over estimations when computed from the right. The problems will tell you either how many steps to take within the interval, so you have to figure out how many there are. Ie, in the interval (1,2) with 4 steps from the right, you would take the area of the rectangle from each of the right hand points under the curve.

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Yes integration but that's negligible. It has to do with using sigma notation where you have n Rectangles within a region of a curve. I said f(x) = length of rectange and dx = width of each rectangle.

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Yes I understand the application of Riemann sums, merely what is f(x) and dx in relation to them.

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    nope if you want to find that of a triangle you have to do a double sum

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    where x is length and y is width.

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Rectangle*

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    F(x) is the function that you are using rectangles under. It is the curve itself. With regards to riemann sums, dx is simply a Label to demonstrate area under the curve.

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    f(x) is the function that represents the curve that the riemann sums approximates the area under. dx is the infitestimally small thickness of each rectangle in the riemann sums as you let the number of rectangles in the riemann sum increase to infinity

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Haha jinx Athenian.

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Does that answer your question?

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Yes, good night everyone.

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