anonymous
  • anonymous
Evaluate: I will post problem
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
Hey! We 've verified this expert answer for you, click below to unlock the details :)
SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
schrodinger
  • schrodinger
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[\int\limits_{-1}^{3} (3x-5)^4\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
I get to 1/24(3x-5)^8
anonymous
  • anonymous
this is before I substitute

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

anonymous
  • anonymous
1st I get u=3x-5 3dc= 1/3 du
anonymous
  • anonymous
the dc is dx
anonymous
  • anonymous
Where are you getting 1/24 and ^8?
anonymous
  • anonymous
never mind the 1/24 and 1/8 I looked at something else as I was writing. I will redo this one first
anonymous
  • anonymous
how about 1/15(3x-5)^5 does that look better? I really unsure about what I am doing.
anonymous
  • anonymous
this answer is before I substitute
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yeah, that looks right
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[\int\limits (3x-5)^4 \, dx = -\frac{1}{15} (5-3 x)^5 \] \[\int\limits_{-1}^3 (3x-5)^4 \, dx= \frac{11264}{5} \] \[\left(-\frac{1}{15} (5-3 x)^5\text{/.}x\to 3\right)-\left(-\frac{1}{15} (5-3 x)^5\text{/.}x\to -1\right)=\frac{11264}{5} \]
anonymous
  • anonymous
Good example to follow. (You miswrote the problem.
anonymous
  • anonymous
why did you switch to 5-3x and not keep it as 3x-5
anonymous
  • anonymous
typo
anonymous
  • anonymous
where did I miswrite the problem? The only thing I left off was the dx at the end
anonymous
  • anonymous
Not you Robto
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok
anonymous
  • anonymous
now I think I should have 1/15(3(3)-5)^4 - 1/15(3(-1)-5)^4 1/15(16) - 1/15(4096) is that correct so far??
anonymous
  • anonymous
Processing chaguanas's statement.
anonymous
  • anonymous
?
anonymous
  • anonymous
are you still there
anonymous
  • anonymous
what's wrong?
anonymous
  • anonymous
did you see the last post I made What I think I should have after substitution
anonymous
  • anonymous
Your process is right. I don't have to check the minutia, that part is all arithmetic. Put you are inputting -1. The writing is very small on the original problem is the low end point 1 or -1?
anonymous
  • anonymous
-1 I was just checking because the problem asks to express as a decimal, approximate to one decimal place. After I do the problem I get -272. I thought I might be doing it wrong.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Approximate to one decimal place, tells you nothing of the answer. It is instructions on how to write your answer. Assuming that is the right answer, to one decimal place is -272.0
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok I was just thinking the answer would be different
anonymous
  • anonymous
mom: Way to go mom. No ambiguity in your problem statement. chaguanas: \[-\frac{1}{15} (5-3 x)^5 = \frac{1}{15} (3 x-5)^5 \] I am using the Mathematica program, version 8, to solve this and that on this web site. With Mathematica at my disposal I am not about to solve anything related to mathematics with pencil and paper. Mathematica has been in development for some years now. In the early years the developers made some decisions regarding the input language construction and what they would deliver for output forms (answers). One thing that "does not look right" is that their polynomial answers are printed with the exponents, in the exponential terms, ordered low to high, not high to low as presented on school chalk/white boards. At first that was annoying for me but soon one adjusts and excepts their formulations. Probably the tendency for some inexperienced math students is to conclude that because a polynomial as written "doesn't look right", it must be inherently wrong and conveys the wrong intent.

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.