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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

A ball of radius 11 has a round hole of radius 7 drilled through its center. Find the volume of the resulting solid.

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Find the volume of the ball and then subtract the volume of the hole.

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    that is what i have been trying. a ball is a sphere so v= 4/3r^3 and the hole is a cylinder pi*r^2*h but what is h the height it isnt the diameter of the sphere

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    The height is the the radius of the ball times 2 (Diameter) :)

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    a cylindrical hole would be slightly shorter than the diameter of the sphere the thing is idk how to find that

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    If you are going to picture this out in your mind, or better yet, get a pen and paper and draw it.. You will find out that it is the height of sphere. Operative word is "center of the ball".

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i did do that and i believe it was the diameter, but after some rethinking, as well as the answer being wrong i saw a different picture. Imagine a sphere. it is round obviously if you drill a hole threw it the the whole will be a cylinder. Cylinders have flat bases. A flat base would mean it cuts off before the end of the sphere. if the height was the diameter it would mean that the base is curved

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    afs brings a good point did you learn triple/double integrals yet? i believe that that is the only way to get the answer

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Oh yeah! Figured that one out thanks for the clear description. @_@

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    We are at area between curves and volume between curves. i kind of know how to do those, but this, which is one of them, doesn't give all the info, all i need is the height and im good but dont know the height. :( @ mcometa :D

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i think you can do this using what you do do you know the washer method yet?

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i zoned out for that one, im using the shell method, but i dont know how exactly to apply it to this

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ehh...i'm not sure what the shell method is LOL but the washer method is bascially integral curve1-curve2

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Are you doing this in polar? or spherical?

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    And is this calc 3 or calc 2

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so now imagine your cylinder and sphere on the xy plane ONLY the xy plane you'll see a circle and a rectangle curve1 will be the circle and curve2 will be the rectangle apply washer. this should work.

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so the equation for the volume of a sphere - the volume of a cylinder? and @ polpak ? oh and calc 2

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    no

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    did what i just wrote make any sense?

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    lol i typed that before reading urs and yes it did i'll go ahead and try that ty :D

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    okay good luck rotate about y axis! cheers!

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