anonymous
  • anonymous
what is the area of the triangle bounded by the lines: x=1, y=x-1, y=3-x
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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chestercat
  • chestercat
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anonymous
  • anonymous
Some thing doesn't seem right. Check and write question word for word. Why is there two y's?
anonymous
  • anonymous
All the info is correctly listed. I'm still stumped on it.
anonymous
  • anonymous
What is the area of the triangle bounded by the lines x = 1, y = x − 1, and y = 3 − x ?

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anonymous
  • anonymous
OK, I get it. These are graphs of lines, not actual measurements.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes - they form a triangle when graphed. I need to find the area of that triangle.
anonymous
  • anonymous
You can graph it and get their measurements. Or you can use algebra, for example \[x-1=3-x\]Solve for x. That is one point of intersection. Depends on if you are a visual person, draw graph, if you are a logical thinker and algebra lover, do it by algebra.
anonymous
  • anonymous
so would the answer be 2? do I stop there?
anonymous
  • anonymous
why just those 2 only?
anonymous
  • anonymous
the 3rd one really bumped me off the train lol
anonymous
  • anonymous
No that is just one point of the triangle, x=2, punch that in the other triangle y=1. One corner of the triangle is at the point (2,1)
anonymous
  • anonymous
Alright, I worked it out and got (4) for the area of the triangle bounded by the lines
anonymous
  • anonymous
were you able to work up a quick answer to compare?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I haven't done it but if you tell me what you did, I can check.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I found the other 2 corners of the triangle and added/subtracted them together and got (4).
anonymous
  • anonymous
I don't know exactly what you did. You would have to give more detail. But to go that route you would have to know the (x,y) point of each intersection, use distance formula to compute distance then, area formula half base times height.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I think I mixed up what I"m supposed to do
anonymous
  • anonymous
I found all the points - where do I go from there exactly? I appreciate the help.
anonymous
  • anonymous
This is a simple enough graph that you could plot by hand to get the distances.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I just graphed it - just by looking at it, I see the area being a 1x1 box
anonymous
  • anonymous
well 2 triangles
anonymous
  • anonymous
so the area is = 1
anonymous
  • anonymous
That is your first clue that you did something wrong. A triangle is a triangle, a box is a box. Take each y line, write down some values x=0, y= etc, and the line that says x=1 is just a straight line joining the two others.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I did that - I cut the triangle in half and made a box and just counted the units
anonymous
  • anonymous
My points for the triangle are: (1,1) - (2,1) - (1,2)
anonymous
  • anonymous
don't mind the "-", I Just used those to space them out
anonymous
  • anonymous
May be you are right, I am just not familiar with your method. Area of a triangle can be found by half base times height http://mathcentral.uregina.ca/QQ/database/QQ.09.02/dean1.html
anonymous
  • anonymous
(1/2)(2) x (1) = 1
anonymous
  • anonymous
Can we conclude that 1 is the answer?
anonymous
  • anonymous
So what course are you working so I can understand what level of math you are or else I might say thing you might not understand.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Calc
anonymous
  • anonymous
Don't get hang up on any one question, write the number down and go in to your teacher's office hours. You have a good work ethic. Keep it up. But you have to put in a lot of work because you are not asking calculus questions. Don't get discouraged. 'Keep working,' that's what my tutor says at the end of each session.

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