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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

You have a 3.00mL of a 500 mg/dl urea standard. How much water must be added to produce a final concentration of 200mg/dl?

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  1. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    mg = ..milligrams? dl =....got no clue lol

  2. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    whats mg/dl mean?

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    milligrams per deciliter

  4. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    i suspected as much... :)

  5. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    3 mL = .03 decaliters...

  6. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    500*.03 = 15 500(.03) + 0(w) = 200(.03 + w) I assume

  7. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    500 = 6 + 20w 496 = 20w 24.8 = w 24.8 decaliters of water if I did it right :)

  8. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    2480 mL of water sound right to you?

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    seems a little high, since the standard was only 3.00mL

  10. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    i see an error..... I did 20 and not 200; dropped an important zero :)

  11. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    500 = 6 + 200w 496 = 200w 496/200 = w water = 2.48 dl which is 248 mL

  12. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    ..still off; i see another error :)

  13. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    500*.03 = 15 15 = 6 + 200w 9 = 200w 9/200 = w 0.045 decaliters of water if I did it right this time... w = 4.5 mL ....better?

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    that seems correct!

  15. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    lol ..... gonna have to recall alot of prescriptions after that :)

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i appreciate it!

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    may i ask how you got the 6, in 15 = 6 + 200w?

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Let t be the amount of chemical. Then t/3.00 = 500 => t = 1500 t/x = 200 => x = 1500/200 = 7.5 mL must be added

  19. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    200*.03 = 6

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    No 3.5 must be added for total of 7.5

  21. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    i figure we need a 200 solution that is a combonation of .03 and "water" 200(.03 + w) = 6 + 200w ..... not that the equation is right to begin with :)

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Shoot 4.5 added to the original 3.0 to get 7.5

  23. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    ivan..lol; was I right :)

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yep both ways work, i appreciate the help!

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    This is why I suck on a test

  26. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    the math I can do....sometimes, when the moon is full and the butterflies are dancing among the daisies that is :)

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i've got a few more, i'll post questions, walking me through that made so much more sense

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    You must change mine to be kosher t/(3.00+ x) = 1500 => .... x = 4.5

  29. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Or you could introduce let new amount_new = 3.00 + x Then t/amount_new = 200 or Amount_new = 1500/200 =7.5 => x = 7.5 - 3.0 = 4.5

  30. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Thanks!

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