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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

how do i reduce (-√3/2)^2...does the negative remain?

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    nope, since it's inside the brackets and the whole thing is squared then the negative disappears and the square root disappears too ^_^ so it's 3/2 again lol

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i thought there was a rule that said if you square a fraction with a square root in the numerator, then the the denominator gets squared too. so in the above example the √3 becomes 3 and the 2 in the bottom become 2^2 = 4...little confused about fractions and exponents

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    wait is it sqrt(3) / 2? or sqrt(3/2)?

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    it comes from the "unit circle" so its sqrt(3)/2

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    oh, then when you square it , it will become 3/4, I thought it was sqrt(3/2) lol sorry :)

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    k...perfect...i thought i had it. maybe you know this one though...same question but not sqrt...this one is exponent 100

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    e^100?

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I used the calculator and got 2.69 x10^43 ^_^

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i know ...crazy value eh...that cant be right

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    LOL, why not? as long as it's not negative, then it's right :)

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    well this is for using de moivre's theorem to find a complex number....i've yet to see anything that large..then i would multiply that by (cos50pi + i sin50pi).....if you're familiar with this math

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    not really, I'm not :( sorry

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    that;s cool...thanks for the fraction help...i've been confused about that one all day

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Per Mathematica: \[\left(-\frac{\sqrt{3}}{2}\right)^2=(-1)^2 \left(3^{2/2} 2^{-2}\right)=\frac{3}{4} \]

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    you're welcome ^_^

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