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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

if 0 < k <pi, then 0 (integral) k cos(2x) dx = 1/2 when k=?

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    use equation option

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    \[\int\limits_{0}^{k} \cos(2x) dx =1/2\] thats what i meant

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    [sin(2k)/2]-sin(0/2)=sin(2k)/2=1/2 sin(2k)=1 2k=[\pi/2\] so k=\[\pi/4\]

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    why do you divide by 2?

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    as you have 2x

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    in more detail put 2x=t..........(1) now differentiate both sides 2dx=dt dx=dt/2 and limits will change like this t=0 at x=0 .......from (1) t=2k

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    now solve interms of t

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    t is a random variable or what does it stand for?

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    random

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    sorry i dont get it still, i guess cause thats not how they have taught us over here...um are you showing me the antiderivative?

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    what's ur country name?

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    United States of America

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    k i was showing u the antiderivative

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ohh ok.. i was told to add one to the power and divide by the new power, is that what you did?

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    it in the case of polynomial i mean sometjing like....x^2 or x^100

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    um ok?

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    if you have sin (polynomial of degreee 1) or cos(polynomial of degree 1) then simply do integretion 4 sin(x) or cos(x) then divide it by integretion of polynomial

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thats why you divided by 2 since it was in the polynomial?

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    sorry its late and im a sort of slow now

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ok add me as fan

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    lol

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    your last name is patel?

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    a friend of mine in calculus is last named patel he is from india, in any way related? i know big world but we found a cousin of his in a math competition lol

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    no i don't know him but i m also from INDIA

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i guess its a popular last name from over there

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yep

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    what's ur full name

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    mine?

  29. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yeah!

  30. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    benjamin vasquez

  31. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    got it any more q benjamin

  32. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    nope! thank you so much

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