A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • 5 years ago

a family has 5 children. the probability of having a girl is 1/2. what is the probability of having no girls?

  • This Question is Closed
  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    suppose you have a coin. what is the probability of it landing heads?

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok i know the answer to the question is .0313, anyone know how?

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    see if 1/32 is 0.0313

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yeah how did you get 32

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    the probability of having a girl is 1/2. so the probability of having a boy is 1/2. in a family of 5 children, all are boys. i.e, there are no girls. so the parents had five boys consecutively. so the probability of having 5 boys in a row is 1/2 times 1/2 times 1/2 times 1/2 times 1/2

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok thanks, know how to get this one? a bag contains 6 cherry, 3 orange, and 2 lemon candies. you reach in and take 3 pieces of candy at random. find the probability you with pick 2 cherry and 1 lemon

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes, but do you want the answer or do you want to learn how to do this?

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    learn how, i know the answer

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    okay. so suppose you have 2 candies in the bag. one is lemon and one is grape. what is the probability that you will pick the lemon candy?

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    1/2

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    okay good. suppose you have three candies. one lemon one grape and one cherry. what is the probability you pick the lemon ?

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    1/3

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    okay good. suppose you have three candies, two lemon and one cherry. what is the probability you pick a lemon candy?

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    2/3

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    okay very good. now you have 6 cherry, 3 lemon and 2 grape candies. what is the probability that you pick one cherry candy?

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    6/11

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    okay very good. now, you have already picked one candy. so there are ten candies left. 5 cherry, 3 lemon and 2 grape. what is the probability that you pick a cherry candy?

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    5/10 so 1/2

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes, good. now there are 9 candies left. 4 cherry, 3 lemon and 2 grape. what is the probability that you pick a lemon candy?

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    3/9, and then you multiply right? thats how i tried to solve the original one but i got the wrong answer

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes, so the probability that you pick 2 cherry candies in a row and then one lemon candy is 6/11 times 1/2 times 1/3.

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    for 6 cherry, 3 orange, and 2 lemon; the prob of 2 cherry and 1 lemon: answer is supposed to be .1818

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    solving its that way gets .0909

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    the question says there are only 2 lemon candies and there are 3 orange candies. so for the third try, you pick a lemon candy out of 9 candies, the probability of that is 2/9 so the answer should be 6/11 times 1/2 times 2/9

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yeah i can do that and get .0606; but the book says the answer is supposed to be .1818

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    thats why im confused

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    wait, is that supposed to be in that order?

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    it says at random

  29. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yeah it says random, but is the expected answer 1 cherry then 1 cherry then 1 lemon or is it that you pick three candies and you end up with 2 cherries and 1 lemon?

  30. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    okay looks like you are not reaching in three times. you just reach in once and take three candies.

  31. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    it says "you reach in and take 3 pieces of candy at random"

  32. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    do you know how to figure it out that way?

  33. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yeah. you have to do it the following way: 6C2/11C3 times 2C1/11C3

  34. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    c?

  35. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    have you done permutations and combinations? BTW ignore my answer. that is incorrect. I will calculate the correct answer and post it here.

  36. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    my teacher gave us problems to do but never taught us how, but yes we are supposed to be doing permutations and combinations. any quick formulas i can jot down for the test?

  37. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    The answer is 6C2 times 2C1 divided by 11C3

  38. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ohh ok that makes sense! thanks!

  39. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so that is 15 times 2 divided by 165 = 30/165 = 0.181818181

  40. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    you dont know how to do combinations?

  41. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    nope:(

  42. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    then how did it make sense to you?

  43. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    she showed us the calculator commands for the c but didnt show us what it was for, now i know

  44. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    http://www.mathsisfun.com/combinatorics/combinations-permutations.html

  45. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    read through that and ask me if you have doubts.

  46. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    thanks soo much!

  47. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    probability in poker, a flush in any suit?

  48. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    what is your question?

  49. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.