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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

Can someone solve this please? the points (2,6) and (3,18) lie on the curve y=ax^n use logarithms to find the values of a and n, giving your answers correct to 2d.p. thanks :)

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    6 = a(2^n) ------> a = 6/2^n 18 = a(3^n)-------> 18 = 6(3^n)/(2^n)---->3 = 3^n/2^n

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    3 = (3/2)^n

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i dont know what you did :(

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    how did you get 3=(3/2)^n?

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    because 18 = 6(3/2)^n, divide both sides by 6

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ok :)

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    but i need a number with 2dp :S

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    okay. so we have 3 = (3/2)^n take log on both sides log 3 = log(3/2)^n -------> log 3 = n log(3/2) ----> n = log 3/ log(3/2) use calculator to find the value of n to 2 dp

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    2.71!!! YAYA! thanks ill give u a medal :)

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    you are welcome.

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    use n to find a by substituting in one of the equations.

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    oh :( i thought that the qs ended ill do that now then :)

  13. myininaya
    • 5 years ago
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    ok I got n=log(1/3) /log(2/3) maybe I made a mistake

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    :S

  15. myininaya
    • 5 years ago
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    oh wait it might be the same thing lol

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ya lol

  17. myininaya
    • 5 years ago
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    there are so many properties with log

  18. myininaya
    • 5 years ago
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    the reason they are the same is : log(1/3) /log(2/3)=[log1-log3]/[log2-log3]=[0-log3]/[(-1)(log3-log2)]=log3/[log3/2]

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    wow, it looks like a sentence without any words XD

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    its not hard to understand if you think about it, Miss.

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    n=ln3\(ln3/2) et a=6/[2^(ln3/2)]

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i dont actually understand it it looks like random equations put together :p

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    okay. I hope for your sake that you are not taking math as a major course then :)

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    no, really wanna drop it next year. its way too hard i cant manage it :(

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes, some people are good at certain things, others are good at other things.

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