anonymous
  • anonymous
why is current the same everywhere in a circuit of a battery and resistor ? Doesn't the resistor slow down the chargers, thus they take more time to move in the resistor and thus I=dq/dt decreases ? Please answer with the state of the charges in the circuit
Physics
jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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radar
  • radar
Currtent is dq/dt or speed of charge. Resistance will reduce current. I think you can draw your own conclusion.
anonymous
  • anonymous
physmath: why don't resistors slow charges down ? If we use the water pipe analogy, on a tighter section of the pipe (smaller diameter), water actually speeds up. Does that means that electrons speed up in the resistance ? radar: yes, resistance will reduce the current in the whole circuit (if we assume that current is constant in all portions of the circuit). I don't see what to conclude from what you've said.
radar
  • radar
If increased resistance reduces current, and according to Ohms Law it does, then we must conclude that dq/dt is now reduced (charge movemen) then the rate of charge moving past a point has also reduced. My conclusion is resistors do slow down charges!

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radar
  • radar
or at least the speed of charge movement.
radar
  • radar
If that is true, and I am convinced it is, if I started counting individual charges (electrons). I would observe a lower count per unit of time. Comphrendo?
radar
  • radar
Remember ezadam, an ampere is 6.241 x 10^18 electrons (1 coulomb) pass a given point per each second of time.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thanks for your effort, physmath. I just wasn't thinking really straight about my current misconception. The water pipe analogy actually works well for understanding this concept. As a conclusion, resistors in a series circuit decrease the overall circulating current, but charge carriers actually speed up when they go into the resistors.

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