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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

if you want to find the velocity function of a problem would you just take the 1st derivative of the original equation? for ex. s(t)=-16t^2-64t+512?

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  1. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    velocity is the derivative of position; yes the change of distance with respect to time/parameter

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yeah ds/dt = v

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ok now my next question is when you are asked to find the acceleration of an object how would you do that? after finding the 1st derivative/velocity function?

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    differejntiate it again

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    a=dv/dt so a = d2v/dv2

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so i should take the derivative of the velocity function?

  7. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    what is curvature :)

  8. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    the change in direction with respect to distance :)

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    no its the beauty of jennifer aniston..lol

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yeah a=dv/dt

  11. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    does your s(t) there indicate position of speed?

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    position as a function of time

  13. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    the derivative of that function will tell you the speed it is going at any given position in time then

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yea the reason why im asking this is because my professor gave us a question like this a while back and he asked for the velocity function, and then the acceleration. i got the velocity function no problem but then messed up and got the acceleration wrong. so just to clarify (velocity function = 1st derivative of original function, acceleration function = derivative of the velocity function?) thanks for all the help i really appreciate it

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yeah its right

  16. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    the derivative of velocity as part of acceleration.... if you do vectors

  17. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    a = d^2s/dt^2.<T> + k(ds/dt)^2<N>

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ok thanks everyone, im sure i will have a few more questions as this study session progressively gets more intense!

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