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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

Is there another way to find the flux of the gradient of a scalar field through a shape than just taking the line integral for a vector field?

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  1. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    thats was going to be my next chapter that i read to the kids for a bedtime story :)

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    The function i have gives me an unsolvable integral when i use a line integral to find the flux of the gradient..

  3. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    what does flux of a gradient mean; i know what a gradient is; but flux?

  4. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    sounds like soldering :)

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    im given a scaler field im told to find the gradient and integrate it around a shape

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    the gradient that is.

  7. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    whats the function?

  8. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    im gonna read vector fields tonight; i hope its steamy ;)

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    xe^(yz) my shape is r(t)=<-2rcos(t),rcos(t),2sqrt(2)sin(t)> t is between 0 and pi and my r is 2

  10. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    Ok; the gradient should be the derivatives of your function in vector format..right?

  11. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    gF(x,y,z) = <dF/dx, dF/dy, dF/dz> right?

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yeah

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i cant take the strait line integral and stokes doesnt work because the curl of the grad is zero

  14. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    gF = <e^(yz),zx.e^(yz),yx.e^(yz)> the gradient vector right?

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yup

  16. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    thats the extent of my abilities with that :)

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ...

  18. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    what is a flux?

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    you cant help me

  20. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    prolly not :)....give me a week ;)

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    maybe a little longer

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    No he's taking the same class you are (calc 3) so he'll probably be covering this later in the term

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    found it http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Line_integral#Path_independence

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    im taking vectors

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    didnt cover this in calc 3

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    really? It was covered in my 3rd semester calc class along with surface integrals, etc. Stoke's, Green's, etc

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    flux but not this indepth of line integral theory

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