anonymous
  • anonymous
Is there another way to find the flux of the gradient of a scalar field through a shape than just taking the line integral for a vector field?
Mathematics
chestercat
  • chestercat
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amistre64
  • amistre64
thats was going to be my next chapter that i read to the kids for a bedtime story :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
The function i have gives me an unsolvable integral when i use a line integral to find the flux of the gradient..
amistre64
  • amistre64
what does flux of a gradient mean; i know what a gradient is; but flux?

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amistre64
  • amistre64
sounds like soldering :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
im given a scaler field im told to find the gradient and integrate it around a shape
anonymous
  • anonymous
the gradient that is.
amistre64
  • amistre64
whats the function?
amistre64
  • amistre64
im gonna read vector fields tonight; i hope its steamy ;)
anonymous
  • anonymous
xe^(yz) my shape is r(t)=<-2rcos(t),rcos(t),2sqrt(2)sin(t)> t is between 0 and pi and my r is 2
amistre64
  • amistre64
Ok; the gradient should be the derivatives of your function in vector format..right?
amistre64
  • amistre64
gF(x,y,z) = right?
anonymous
  • anonymous
yeah
anonymous
  • anonymous
i cant take the strait line integral and stokes doesnt work because the curl of the grad is zero
amistre64
  • amistre64
gF = the gradient vector right?
anonymous
  • anonymous
yup
amistre64
  • amistre64
thats the extent of my abilities with that :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
...
amistre64
  • amistre64
what is a flux?
anonymous
  • anonymous
you cant help me
amistre64
  • amistre64
prolly not :)....give me a week ;)
anonymous
  • anonymous
maybe a little longer
anonymous
  • anonymous
No he's taking the same class you are (calc 3) so he'll probably be covering this later in the term
anonymous
  • anonymous
found it http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Line_integral#Path_independence
anonymous
  • anonymous
im taking vectors
anonymous
  • anonymous
didnt cover this in calc 3
anonymous
  • anonymous
really? It was covered in my 3rd semester calc class along with surface integrals, etc. Stoke's, Green's, etc
anonymous
  • anonymous
flux but not this indepth of line integral theory

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