A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • 5 years ago

Find the following: if f(x) = x²+1 and g(x)=2x-3 whats ==> (G*F)(2)

  • This Question is Closed
  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    (gf) (x) = (x^2+1)(2x-3)

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    G*F=2(x^2+1)-3

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    sub x=2 so 5(1)=5

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    put x=2 gives. 7

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    (gf)(2) = 5 other guy doesnt know what hes on botu lol

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so its 2(x²+1)-3 => 2x²+2-3 ==>(2x²-1) ===>(2x²-1)(2) =====>(4x²-2)

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    elecengineer states that g(f(x)) is simply the producy g(x).f(x), which is incorrect. The composition of two functions g(f(x)) is as stated by dipankarstudy. ghhosst seems to be substituting incorrectly. As he states, after simplifying, g(f(x)) = 2x^2 - 1. Putting x = 2, we get 2(2)^2 - 1 = (2 times 4) - 1 = 7 as derived above by dipankarstudy

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    lols whatever guyc newb . I am doind second year engineering noob, i am current on 100% for vector calculus and complex analysis, but you can think what you want

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    if they wanted the compositions of function then they would have written g (f(x)) , IN THAT FORM! when someone writes f*g , they have even included the asterick, which denotes multiplication, so if you want to be 100% pedantic ( which I am ) , the asker wants the product of the functions evaluated at 2

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes, I have seen some people use (g o f ) (x) to represent g(f(x)) , but in this case the asterick was used, suggest a product of functions

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Yes, I see what you mean. It could be that the original poster typed the question slightly differently, thinking that g*f(2) means the same as g(f(2)). Apologies, I didn't mean to be rude.

  12. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.