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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

How do you use l'Hopital's rule when you don't have any equations for the lines, just a graph without numerical distinctions? When, for example, a function is representative of the ratio of two functions on the graph?

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  1. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    the graph tells you the limits right? Lhoptials rule is for working th enumbers without a graph i thiought

  2. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    you can try to match an equation to the graph; by plotting points and wrapping a curve to it; or you can try to work out a suitable equation by loooking that the way the graph behaves at its asymptotes

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I'm not sure. It's a preamble to l'hopital's rule, but we are supposed to use it to find the limits.... I'm not sure these graphs are guessable equations.

  4. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    itd help to have apicture to go by ;)

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    okay give me a second to scan it

  6. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    in essense, a rational expression is controlled by 2 polynomials that fight for control

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    it won't let me post the scanned image. but anyways for the one the one function is approaching infinity faster than the other function is approaching negative infinity

  8. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    you save the image as a jpeg?

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes i saved it as a jpeg from the original scan form of a tif

  10. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    hmm..... be right back.

  11. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    lhopital allows says we can find the limit of certain undeterminate setups by taking the derivative of the top and the bootom, and finding their limits right?

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes that is true... lim x--> a f(x)/g(x) =f'(x)/g'(x)

  13. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    wish i had a pic of that graph :)

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    okay i'm trying to do this the difficult way now. i'm downloading the scan to photobucket where it seems to be working

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    http://i1201.photobucket.com/albums/bb350/jacquefrfly9/Scan0002.jpg

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    its part 6

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