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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

simplify 8^2/3 x 2^-1/3

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    \[8=2^{3} so... 8^{(2/3)}=2^{2}\]

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    then you have 2^2 * 2^(-1/3). Add the exponents

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    \[8^{\frac{2}{3}}\] means cube root of 8 squared. cube root of 8 is 2, 2 squared is 4

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    2 + (-1/3) = 5/3 So the answer would be 2 ^ (5/3)

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i got lost somewhere

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    in order to simplify, you have to have a common base. So by simplifying the 8, you can get everything written with a base of 2

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    they are added...not multiplied?

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    like satellite said, the cube root of 8 is 2, so that gives you 2^2

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    well, when multiplying, you add the exponents....think x^2*x^3 = x^5

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i understand the first number, not the second 2^(-1/3)

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so, since they both have a base of 2, you can add their exponents

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ok...gotcha on the addition

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    You don't have to change anything in 2^(-1/3), since it alrady has a base of 2

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    how do you get 5/3 by adding -1/3 and 2

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    sorry im slow lol

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    get common denominators....2 = 6/3

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    :)

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    -1/3 + 6/3 = 5/3

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    duh moment lol

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    haha

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    makes sense now

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    great!

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    im new to this site. how exactly does it work...students helping students?

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    mostly

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i have a few more of these problems, but i want to try them myself...try at least lol

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thanks for your help

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