anonymous
  • anonymous
With the given lengths would this be a right triangle? (square root symbols) √11 yds, √5 yds, 16yds
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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katieb
  • katieb
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anonymous
  • anonymous
pythagorean theorem
anonymous
  • anonymous
what do you know about Pythagorean theorem?
anonymous
  • anonymous
a squared + b squared = c squared

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anonymous
  • anonymous
then why don't you try the combination and see if they satisfy the theorem.
anonymous
  • anonymous
and make it equal 180 degrees for a triangle?
anonymous
  • anonymous
square root off is 3.3
anonymous
  • anonymous
I meant square root of 11 is 3.3
anonymous
  • anonymous
huh? why are you making the problem more complicated than it is? They have given you lengths of the three sides of a triangle. All they want to know is if the triangle is a right angled triangle. The way to find out if a triangle is right angled or not is to see if its sides satisfy the pythagorean theorem. That is it. Don't try and make it harder for yourself.
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok so two square roots and one is not... therefore no
anonymous
  • anonymous
what?
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[(\sqrt{11})^{2}+(\sqrt{5})^{2} = ?\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
Ok I'm not sure... but I came up with 6.6 + 4.4 = 11 by definition: the square of the length of the hypotenuse is equal to the sum of the squares of the lengths of the legs. So again I would say this is not a right triangle ??
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes, you are right. It is not a right angle triangle.
anonymous
  • anonymous
was that right how I did the calculations tho? took square root of 11 times it by two .... the same for square root of 5 times by two and then add ... was that number supposed to add up to 16? to make it a right triangle?
anonymous
  • anonymous
wait...3.3 squared plus 2.2 squared = 10.89 + 4.84 = 15.73 thats close to 16
anonymous
  • anonymous
square root of 4 is 2. that means 2 times 2 is 4. that means \[\sqrt{4} \times \sqrt{4} = 4\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
right
anonymous
  • anonymous
so \[(\sqrt{11})^{2} = \sqrt{11} \times \sqrt{11} = 11\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh I surely did not know that...
anonymous
  • anonymous
the very fact that you are squaring square roots of a number means that you will get the number within the square root. That is the definition of square root.
anonymous
  • anonymous
what did you think square root meant then?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I don't know... I do know the square root of 81 is 9...
anonymous
  • anonymous
stuff like that
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes, square root of 81 is 9. that means that 9 times 9 is 81. similarly square root of 3 is 1.73205081 that means that 1.73205081 times 1.73205081 is 3.
anonymous
  • anonymous
instead of calling it square root everytime, we write it is \[\sqrt{3}\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes I know... not sure how to do symbols on line
anonymous
  • anonymous
11 + 5 = 16 therefore it is a right triangle
anonymous
  • anonymous
what is the third side? is it 16 or square root(16)
anonymous
  • anonymous
just 16
anonymous
  • anonymous
square root of 16 I know is 4
anonymous
  • anonymous
so what does the pythagorean theorem say?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm confused...... I already said it... I just dont know if these numbers are supposed to add up to something or have all perfect numbers from the roots? UGGGH
anonymous
  • anonymous
or the two square roots equal 16? Please be patient with me....
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[(\sqrt{11})^{2} + (\sqrt{5})^{2} = 16 \neq 16^{2}\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
I'm ready to pull my hair out!!!
anonymous
  • anonymous
Thank you. That makes sense... that was the part I wasnt sure of.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Here is another one.... (√7)2 + (√2)2 = 9 does not equal √9 Not a right triangle
anonymous
  • anonymous
Got it and thank you for your help!!!!!

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