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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

How do i turn a growth function with respect to height with respect to time into acceleration with respect to time?

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Differentiate it twice.

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    differentiate time?

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    wait distance / time :P

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Yeah differentiate the function with respect to time.

  5. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    height is a position derive it once to find the change in height with respect to time; which is speed, also known as velocity, or how fast the growth is. derive again to find the change in velocity, which is acceleration.

  6. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    derivatives are 'how something changes compared to something else'. Graphically, that represents slope right? how much does the y value change when you move the x?

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Well, I Have a huge problem regarding loggerpro...

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    We did an experiment where we used mentos & coke in-order to investigate exponential growth patterns ect.. Now I'm struggling to realise why my raw data is linear and Ln data is exponential...

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Now this is my raw data. (I've tired to make it exponential :P

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  10. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    that looks like a bounded exponential

  11. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    in other words, the data starts out looking linear, but there is a limit that it approaches

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Yeah =/

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Another picture, this is of my (initial) raw data and the Ln of height

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  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    red = raw and blue = Ln(height)

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ignore the first graph.

  16. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    how did you obtain the data? what were the ...... ignore function activated :)

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    But still... do understand what I mean?

  18. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    almost; can you show me the table that the data comes from? your experiment?

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yeah 1 sec

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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  21. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    so did you come up with a good: y(s) = s function ?

  22. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    the time taken to reach the meters? what does position have to do with time?

  23. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    and of course the higher it gets the slower it goes :)

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yeah umm 1 sec

  25. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    i wrote a program that can fit this to a quadratic :)

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i got y=0.5604x-0.8171

  27. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Do you know how to expain it being a quadratic?

  29. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    explain*

  30. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    it would be a best fit line as well

  31. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    the most basic option would be to take the slope from one point to the next; table that up; and see what it looks like

  32. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yeah, but the next question asks: How well do these functions fit your graphs? Are they a perfect fit? Explain your answer

  33. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    What we are meant to do is determine the function for the graphs

  34. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    perfect fit? any real life experiments are never gonna perfectly fit a model

  35. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    There is one argument :)

  36. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    models are ideals; real life experiments contain to many variables to account for

  37. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so how do i use this quadratic program?

  38. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    you plug in three data points and it takes them to figure out the quadratic that bends to those points; then to test for accuracy, I used a feature to put in a random 'x' point to see if the quadratic is good enough

  39. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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  40. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    another option is to do a method of 'least squares' which i forget the steps to :)

  41. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Alrighty, so ive got the quadratic: 0.807801462732185x^2 + -11.760157128268668x + 40.60929764207282

  42. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    cause what I have to do is work out the equations for each graph, preferable manually.. then predict the spray for 5 mentos.. Justify your response in mathematical reasoning..

  43. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    i didnt see a table option for 'number of mentos'

  44. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    and remember to use diet coke and the minty mentos....

  45. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    We have already conducted the experiment its just if i were able to work out 1 i'd be able to do the others :) However, for number of mentos there is one for 4/7/9

  46. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Heheh you're my last hope now :P

  47. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    mythbusters did an episode on this menthos thing; try to check out their work :) get some ideas if you havent already

  48. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    that cut it short lol just google mythbusters mentos

  49. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    No idea if this is allowed, but do you use skype?

  50. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    aint got the periphials for it.....

  51. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I just want to screen share or something :L

  52. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    do you know how to draw a vector field?

  53. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Nope.

  54. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    you strat out with something like this; and for each point you find the slope (y/x) and plug a vector representation of it at the point to see where the data is moving

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  55. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    and watch it move :)

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  56. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    they prolly have online stuff to do it quicker and easier tho

  57. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    in fact, they proly have online best fit calculators too :)

  58. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    O i can best bit in autograph, its just.. I need to beable to work it out manually. :C

  59. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    manually can be a pain; especially with alot of data points and decimals involved; that reason we have computers is to use as a tool to help us; it aint a cheat ya know :)

  60. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    they teach you the manually so that you have the concept of why it works and how to get to an answer when you aint got the tools avaiable; but before computers it took alot of good mena dnwomen and a few good trout many years to do a single math problem

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