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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

hey guys a question in physics, the angular momentum of the earth revolving around the sun is proportional to R^n where R is the distance between the earth and the sun. the value of n is?

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    L=mvr

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    v=2pi*R/(365*24*3600)

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thats what i thought...but unfortunately my book says it 1/2. i dont know how!

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    \[R^{2}{} (2 \pi)\over(365*24*3600)*\]

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    the value of n should be 2 ryt?

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    that's what I think

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    http://www.livephysics.com/problems-and-answers/classical-mechanics/find-earth-angular-momentum.html here its solved the same way, so i think its plausible to go with 2

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    When I was taking physics I found this site very useful www.physicsfourm.com

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    did you miss an "s" by any chance?

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes http://www.physicsforums.com/

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ok..

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    1/2 is actually correct. I'll prove it for you: L = m (r x v), which means that L = mrv (because in this case, our angle is 90) Now, we know that F (gravity) = GMm/r^2 and that F = ma assuming uniform circular motion, a = v^2/r, which means that v^2 = GM/r^3 Plugging this back into our angular momentum equation, we get \[L = mr^2*\sqrt{GM}*r^{-1.5} = m*\sqrt{GM} * r ^.5\]

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    hey how did you get this, v^2 = GM/r^3 ?? m totally clueless.

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    mv^2/r=GM/r^2 =>v^2=GM/r plugn ds in ang. momntm eq. - L=mvr=mr(GM/r)^(1/2)=m(GMr)^(1/2) so n should be 1/2

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i have a question, why wouldnt replacing v by \[\omega r\] work??

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    It does work, you just need to do an extra step to convert a= v^2/r to w^2r

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    can you work it out. i am not able to comprehend. :-(

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