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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

Partial Differential Equation

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    its number 1

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Alright, I'll take a look.

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    So, the easiest things to see is that anything with a square is non-linear. I'm not certain what they mean by "semi" and "quasi" linear, to be honest.

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    The orders are the highest derivative in each equation, although I need to find my book on inseparable equations to be sure whether it's with respect to a single variable only or not (I believe it is).

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    So gamma and delta are 3rd and 4th order linear, respectively.

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    alpha and beta are both second order, but I view them as both non-linear. But I caution on this one, I'm not familiar with quasi-linear classifications.

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Alright, the second part is a lot easier than I was trying to make it. You find the discriminant of each equation. If its zero, it's parabolic. If it's positive, its hyperbolic, negative, it's elliptic.

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I'm sure you're familiar with characteristic equations, so I'll skip that one.

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    The last problem is simply doing what you know to do, and using the initial/boundary conditions to solve the PDE. Solve the general form as much as possible, finding the general and particular solutions, then solve for the coefficients if needed.

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Any problems with solving the PDE?

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Well, I have to go. You seem to either be busily working or have stepped away. I hope I helped in some way. Good luck!

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