A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • 5 years ago

2log6+log (1/3)=log12 which properties of logarithmics are/is used? power property and product property quotient property and product property quotient property only power property only

  • This Question is Closed
  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Well If I asked you what 2log6 + log(1/3) was, how would you solve it (without using a calculator)?

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    my teacher didnt go over this but still put it on the end of course exam

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    log (1/3) is saying -log 3. With that we can use quotient property

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    If it's just 2log6 +log(1/3) you can reduce it down to 2log6-log(3) because log(1) equal zero

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    2log6 can be written as log6^2 so, log 36

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    log36/log 3 is log 12

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    No it's not. log36 - log3 is log12.

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    same thing

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    make sense?

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    no it isn't. \[\frac{log\ 36}{log\ 3} \ne log(\frac{36}{3})\]

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    log36-log3 =log36/log3

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i'm not saying log(36/3)

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    No, it doesn't. log 36 - log 3 = log(36/3)

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    >>> log(36, 10) - log(3, 10) 1.0791812460476247 >>> log(36,10)/log(3,10) 3.2618595071429146

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Very different numbers.

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    try it in your calculator, (or wolframalpha)

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    log(36/3) is log(12) i checked with calculator and got the same answer so sorry for confusion just disregard the log36/log3

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    You can see quite trivially that it will be equal because 36/3 is 12. So log of 36/3 would be the log of 12. The problem is more about finding that log(36) - log(3) can be written as log(36/3)

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok so what was the problem?

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    The problem with your answer was that you said log(36) - log(3) = log(36)/log(3). But the simplest solution is to just say: \[2log6+log (1/3)\] \[=log36 + log(\frac{1}{3})\] \[=log (36 \times \frac{1}{3})\] \[=log(12)\] Which just uses the power and product rules. That said though you could also solve it by just using the product rule, or using the quotient rule and the power rule. So there's no non-ambiguous way to answer the multiple choice.

  21. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.