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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

is anyone good with trigometry??

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    trigo wat

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    trigonometric

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    maybe.

  4. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    euclid maybe; but hes dead :/

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    post wht you have

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    you can use the pythagorean theorem to find b and then use that to find a

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    this triangle is not possible... your hypotenuse will always be longer than each leg... this is not the case in this picture

  9. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    b^2 + 13^2 = (12+a)^2 5^2 + a^2 = b^2

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    what about this? How long is a string reaching from the top of a 8ft pole to a point 5 ft from the base of the pole?

  11. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    (12+a)^2 - 13^2 = 5^2 + a^2

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    looks like similar triangles to me.

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I'm trying to study for finals...

  14. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    144 + a^2 + 24a - 196 = 25 + a^2 144 - 196 - 25 = -24a 144 - 196 - 25 = a -------------- -24

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    @amistre64 which one is that for?

  16. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    a = 77/24..... the first one you posted

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    how about... A slide 4.1 m long makes an angle of 28 degrees with the ground. How high is the top of the slide above the ground?

  18. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    4.1 sin(28)

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thats all you do for that?

  20. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    yes; unless you wanna put it into a calculator to get an approx distance

  21. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    yeah, that first triangle set up could have been ration

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    what about find the missing abgle and side measure of triangle ABC, given that angle A=50 degrees, Angle C= 90 degrees, and CB=7

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    PEOPLE! it is much easier to solve with similar triangles! 5/13 = a/5 --- > a = 25/13

  24. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    dhat; yeah, i know :) just thought id give it a shot the other way lol

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    oh okay. go on. :)

  26. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    given 2 degrees and a side you can do law of cosines to get another side and then law of sine it with some careful planning

  27. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    given angles and a side; law of sines might be the best optio

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    how excatly would i do that.?

  29. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    never mind that; this is a 90 degree to begin with ABC, given that angle A=50 degrees, Angle C= 90 degrees, and CB=7

  30. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    angB = 40

  31. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    7 AC ----- = ------- tho sin 50 sin(40)

  32. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    ac = abt 5.874 maybe

  33. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    7 ab ----- = ----- = abt 9.12 sin 50 sin90

  34. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    my two options are; A) <B=40 degrees, C=9.1, b=5.9 B) <B=40 degrees, C=8.6, b=5.9

  35. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    the trick is to dbl check that and see how close it is :)

  36. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    a then

  37. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so how'd you get the 7 over sin 50 and the ab over sin90?

  38. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    thats the law of sines; side a side b side c ----- = ------ = ------ sin(a) sin(b) sin(c)

  39. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    7 ----- is a given; so the others just fall from that sin(50)

  40. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ohhh okay. My teacher sucked at teaching the law of sines so i can never get it.

  41. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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  42. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    cos(g) = a/sqrt(45) sin^2 + cos ^2 = 1 sin^2 + a^2/45 = 1 sin^2 = 1 - a^2/45 sin = sqrt(1-a^2/45) tan(g) = sqrt(1-(a^2/45)) --------------- a^2/sqrt(45)

  43. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    tan(g) = sqrt(1-(a^2/45)) (sqrt(45)) ----------------------- a^2 tan(g) = sqrt(1-(a^2/45)(45)) -------------------- a^2 tan(g) = sqrt(45-a^2) ------------ a^2

  44. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    How about this.? Thank you for all your help too. If you need anything in return I'd be glad to

  45. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    x = 23 sqrt(2) y = 23 + 46cos 30

  46. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    hey you wrote this: tan(g) = sqrt(45-a^2) ------------ a^2 But how would i finish it.?

  47. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    With regard to 20110518.13.41.36.jpg: \[a=5 \text{Cos}\left[\frac{\pi }{2}-\text{ArcTan}\left[\frac{5}{12}\right]\right]=\frac{25}{13} \]\[b=5 \text{Sin}\left[\frac{\pi }{2}-\text{ArcTan}\left[\frac{5}{12}\right]\right]=\frac{60}{13} \]\[\sqrt{\left(\frac{25}{13}\right)^2+\left(\frac{60}{13}\right)^2}=5 \]

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