anonymous
  • anonymous
using scientific notation find the logarithm of each number i dnt know how to do this at all two example log 12 and log 0.038 plus dnt know how to read the table feel so dumb
Mathematics
schrodinger
  • schrodinger
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.

Get this expert

answer on brainly

SEE EXPERT ANSWER

Get your free account and access expert answers to this
and thousands of other questions

anonymous
  • anonymous
ok, let's say you want to find log 12 (i'm assuming it's base 10?) we can write this as \[\log(1.2*10^1)=\log(1.2)+\log(10^1)=\log(1.2)+1\] that first step is an important rule with logarithms. Now, if you have a table, let's find 1.2 on it. It's probably broken down into sections based on the first digit or two, and then you have to read across. There's probably a 1.2 row, so you look in that row and go over to the 0 column; this means you're finding the log of 1.20, which is clearly the same as 1.2 since i'm not sure what your table is like, try it and tell me if that's how it's set up. If not, describe it to me (or link)
anonymous
  • anonymous
thats how its set up
anonymous
  • anonymous
sweet, then all you do is take that number and add 1 to it. similarly, for log 0.038, you put it in scientific notation, break it up like I did, and then find the value of 3.8 in the log table, then add.

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

anonymous
  • anonymous
give me one sec
anonymous
  • anonymous
so for 1.2 it would = 0.0792
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes
anonymous
  • anonymous
so do i move the decimal once or twice because you broke 0.038 into 3.8 and 12 into 1.2
anonymous
  • anonymous
you move it as many times as necessary to make it so that there is one digit to the left of the decimal point. Then, the exponent on the ten becomes the number of places you moved it. If you move it to the left, the exponent, is positive, and if it's to the right, it's negative.
anonymous
  • anonymous
for example, 34500 is 3.45*10^4 and .0065 is 6.5*10^(-3)
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok
anonymous
  • anonymous
what about this one 21,100
anonymous
  • anonymous
well, how many places would you have to move the decimal point to make it so that exactly 1 digit is on the left side of it?
anonymous
  • anonymous
1 time
anonymous
  • anonymous
2.1100
anonymous
  • anonymous
how do i find that on the table
anonymous
  • anonymous
that's 4, not 1... you go to the 2.1 row, then over to the 1 column
anonymous
  • anonymous
owww your right forgot about that
anonymous
  • anonymous
but since its 2.11 i find 2.1 the go over to one right
anonymous
  • anonymous
then*
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes
anonymous
  • anonymous
yeah buddy im getting the hang of this
anonymous
  • anonymous
woo :D
anonymous
  • anonymous
thing is im in the ACE program and the book doesnt really explain it as a one on one so its much harder
anonymous
  • anonymous
well, i'm glad to be of help
anonymous
  • anonymous
im glad to be helped lol

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.