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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

using scientific notation find the logarithm of each number i dnt know how to do this at all two example log 12 and log 0.038 plus dnt know how to read the table feel so dumb

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ok, let's say you want to find log 12 (i'm assuming it's base 10?) we can write this as \[\log(1.2*10^1)=\log(1.2)+\log(10^1)=\log(1.2)+1\] that first step is an important rule with logarithms. Now, if you have a table, let's find 1.2 on it. It's probably broken down into sections based on the first digit or two, and then you have to read across. There's probably a 1.2 row, so you look in that row and go over to the 0 column; this means you're finding the log of 1.20, which is clearly the same as 1.2 since i'm not sure what your table is like, try it and tell me if that's how it's set up. If not, describe it to me (or link)

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thats how its set up

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    sweet, then all you do is take that number and add 1 to it. similarly, for log 0.038, you put it in scientific notation, break it up like I did, and then find the value of 3.8 in the log table, then add.

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    give me one sec

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so for 1.2 it would = 0.0792

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so do i move the decimal once or twice because you broke 0.038 into 3.8 and 12 into 1.2

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    you move it as many times as necessary to make it so that there is one digit to the left of the decimal point. Then, the exponent on the ten becomes the number of places you moved it. If you move it to the left, the exponent, is positive, and if it's to the right, it's negative.

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    for example, 34500 is 3.45*10^4 and .0065 is 6.5*10^(-3)

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ok

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    what about this one 21,100

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    well, how many places would you have to move the decimal point to make it so that exactly 1 digit is on the left side of it?

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    1 time

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    2.1100

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    how do i find that on the table

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    that's 4, not 1... you go to the 2.1 row, then over to the 1 column

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    owww your right forgot about that

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    but since its 2.11 i find 2.1 the go over to one right

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    then*

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yeah buddy im getting the hang of this

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    woo :D

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thing is im in the ACE program and the book doesnt really explain it as a one on one so its much harder

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    well, i'm glad to be of help

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    im glad to be helped lol

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