A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • 5 years ago

whats the brain made out of?

  • This Question is Closed
  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    beside neurons?

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Amygdala – limbic structure involved in many brain functions, including emotion, learning and memory. It is part of a system that processes "reflexive" emotions like fear and anxiety. Cerebellum – governs movement. Cingulate gyrus – plays a role in processing conscious emotional experience. Fornix – an arch-like structure that connects the hippocampus to other parts of the limbic system. Frontal lobe – helps control skilled muscle movements, mood, planning for the future, setting goals and judging priorities. Hippocampus – plays a significant role in the formation of long-term memories. Medulla oblongata – contains centers for the control of vital processes such as heart rate, respiration, blood pressure, and swallowing. Limbic system – a group of interconnected structures that mediate emotions, learning and memory. Occipital lobe – helps process visual information. Parahippocampal gyrus – an important connecting pathway of the limbic system. Parietal lobe – receives and processes information about temperature, taste, touch, and movement coming from the rest of the body. Reading and arithmetic are also processed in this region. Pons – contains centers for the control of vital processes, including respiration and cardiovascular functions. It also is involved in the coordination of eye movements and balance. Temporal lobe – processes hearing, memory and language functions. Thalamus – a major relay station between the senses and the cortex (the outer layer of the brain consisting of the parietal, occipital, frontal and temporal lobes).

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    these are the major structures of the brain

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    copied from google.;)

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I know these stuffs since I'm a Bio major, But of course you don't expect me to type that long, so just copied it anyways I also teach Biology so I know the right sources. ;)

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    here u r not suggested to copy paste u need to share ur own views in ur own words.

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Okay, since I'm new here I'll try to be aware with it thank you.

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so sweet of you.

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    u know what i have lot of question on biology for my medical entrance...so i hope u will help me isnt it ..and also by providing me the sources for ..........?

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    okay, maybe I can help on that.

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    The grey wrinkly matter, which is arranged into ridges called gyri (singular gyrus) separated by deep grooves called sulci (singular sulcus), is the cortex of the brain, and is made up principally of the cell bodies of pyramidal neurons embedded in a support matrix comprised of glial cells and glycolipids such as cerebrosides. Beneath this is the white matter, which is made up of the ascending and descending myelinated (fat coated) axons (neuronal extensions) connecting the cortex with lower gray clusters of neurons called nuclei, such as the thalamic, hypothalamic, cranial nerve and brainstem nuclei, and similar structures called ganglia, such as the basal ganglia.

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    supporting connective tissue-glia, choroid cell secreting CSF, blood vessels, CSF...........Coverings dura, arachnoid and pia matter.

  13. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.