A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

moongazer

  • 5 years ago

The equation of a circle center at the origin and radius 1is ?

  • This Question is Closed
  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    x^2 +y^2 =1

  2. moongazer
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    explain why please ill give you a medal if you explained it well

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    there isnt anyway of explaining it really lol

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    the general form a circle with centre (a,b) and radius r is \[(x-a)^2 +(y-b)^2 =r^2\]

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    here centre is (0,0) yeh.. theres not alot of explaining, you have to remember the formula , thats all you can do

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i can explain

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok lets go back to geometry definition

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    you there?

  9. moongazer
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ohh its phytagorus , yeh

  11. moongazer
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    the locus definition

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    a circle is a set of points such that, the distance from the center is fixed

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    right

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    a circle is a locus of points whose distance from a point is constant, that distance is the radius

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    thats the ancient greek definition, going back when

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    now fast forward to cartesian world, we have x y graph

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    your center lets say for convenience is origin (0,0)

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok so far?

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    your doing it the really long way, not very good explaination lol

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ill do it

  22. moongazer
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok but please explain easier to understand

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    he wants a thorough explanation

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    we want d( (x,y) (0,0) = r

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    the distance between (0,0) and the points (x,y) to be the constant radius

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok so far? , and we know the distance between any two points using the distance formula

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    elec, this is not easy to understand? i can show a graph , but this interface sucks balls

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    you can just go straight to the general case centre (a,b) \[\sqrt{(x-a)^2 +(y-b)^2} = r \]

  29. moongazer
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    please explain it like you are explaining it to a kid

  30. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    then square both sides

  31. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    d ( (x1,y1) (x2,y2) ) = sqrt ( (x1-x2)^2 + (y1-y2)^2)

  32. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    right that works

  33. moongazer
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    WAIT!

  34. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so the distance between any arbitrary center (h,k) and the points (x,y) is some distance r. d ( h,k)(x,y) = r

  35. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    , so sqrt ( (x-h)^2 + ( y - k)^2) = r

  36. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    this is a deductive proof my friend :)

  37. moongazer
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    my teacher gave me a really easy solution for this and i just forgot it and then i wrote the equation x^2+y^2=r^2 and i forgot what it means

  38. moongazer
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    on my ntbk

  39. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    if you draw a line from your center to a point on the circle, and then draw a triangle

  40. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    you get pythagorean triangle

  41. moongazer
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    please don't give me a complicated solution

  42. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok youre annoying, bye

  43. moongazer
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    then?

  44. moongazer
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    youre doing it right

  45. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    then what?

  46. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    lols

  47. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    then the world ends tomorrow

  48. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    brb, i will use a whiteboard , this is no good

  49. moongazer
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ahhhh ok

  50. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    a more interesting question has peaked my curiosity, brb

  51. moongazer
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ill just give you both a medal^_^

  52. moongazer
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    for answering and explaining^_^

  53. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    complex numbers: find a, b such that (-bi)^2 = a^2 ?

  54. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    this question is ambiguous, ok one sec

  55. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    here click on this http://www.twiddla.com/542364

  56. moongazer
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    what is this?

  57. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    circle centre (2,3), radius 2

  58. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    its pretty basic

  59. moongazer
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    it is alright know^_^

  60. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.