A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • 5 years ago

This question has to do with z-scores... A dean must distribute salary raises to her faculty for next year. She has decided that the mean raise is to be $2000, the standard deviation of raises is to be $400, and the distribution is to be normal. She will attempt to distribute these raises on the basis of merit, meaning that people whose performance is better get better raises. The 5% of the faculty who have done nothing useful in years will receive no more than $ _________ each.

  • This Question is Closed
  1. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ahhhh.... standard deviations eh.... where my ti-83 at?

  2. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    since it is population; we use mu and such right?

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    but somehow i need to get a z value or an x value for z=x-mean/sd

  5. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    2 standards are within the normal right? 95%......

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yup

  7. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    z = x-mu/omega omega = sqrt(n.p.q) right? and mu=n.p

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    huh? the standard deviation is already given and so is the mean :S

  9. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    lol...ok; then mu = 2000 and omega then is 400 right?

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yup

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    and the 5% is the smaller portion of the distribution. but I don't know how to if its the z score that gives you the 0.05 or if its something else

  12. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    use empiraical rule? gotta similar problem here where sd and mean are given

  13. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    2000 + 400 is one deviation 2000 + 800 is 2 deviations 2000 + 1200 is 3 deviations right?

  14. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    those in the out liers are more than 2 standards so they get a raise of 2000 - 1200 = 800 right?

  15. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    make sense?

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes i think so

  17. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    <.......-2 sd ........ -1 sd..........mean .........etc

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yup

  19. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    might of gone to far in that but you get the basic premise right?

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    lol yea

  21. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    good :) we just went over that in stats class yesterday :)

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    sweet, so do you have a z table with you?

  23. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i got some stuff in my stats book; that might help

  24. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    table a-2; standard deviation (z) distribution

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i have multiple choice answers if it makes a difference. a) 1000, b) 1980, c) 1340 and d)2192 it can't be over 2000 so its one of the first 3 choices :S

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ahh hate stats!

  27. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    c looks plausible, but cant really say for sure....

  28. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    2000 - 2(400) = 1200; but thats just an educated guess...

  29. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    id have to look up how to use a z table to be sure

  30. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    http://www.intmath.com/counting-probability/z-table.php

  31. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    well to my understanding, if the 5% is in the smaller portion of the distribution, then you look up0.05 there and get the z score. then just stick that value int he equation and solve for x but its not working

  32. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    95% falls at the 2 line; and that result is .4772; or 47.72% at most 2000*.4772 = answer maybe? ....954.4 that dint work

  33. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    http://davidmlane.com/hyperstat/z_table.html is a calculator for it i think

  34. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    .02275 is what that gives me

  35. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    thanks!

  36. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    what to do with it I aint got a clue lol

  37. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    hmm it won't let me put the 0.5 anywhere though just keeps saying 0.0000

  38. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    lol me either.

  39. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i put in the mean 2000 the sd 400 and choose below 1200 for the 5%

  40. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i got a 1342 on the bottom part of it lol

  41. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yea i got that too but i dont really know what it means lol

  42. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i think it means pick c :)

  43. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    lol okay. wth! its only one question haha thank you sooooo much for your help!!

  44. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    :) hope we are right ;)

  45. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    me too :D

  46. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.