A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • 5 years ago

find the cartesian equation of r = 8 sin thet + 8 cos theta

  • This Question is Closed
  1. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    its a circle centered at the irigin of radius 8 maybe?

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[r =\sqrt{x ^{2}+y ^{2}}\]

  3. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    polars and parametrics aint my strong point ;)

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    youre good at vectors :)

  5. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yep, I can point at things all day lol

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    haha, and good at planes

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    maybe youre good at visualizing things?

  8. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    im pretty good at visualizing stuff

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok we can use x = r cos theta, and y = r sin theta,

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    so multiply both sides by r

  11. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    spinning polars tho.....not so much; aint had the practice

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[\sin \theta =x/r\]

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ive read the vector stuff, it just wont stick. for some reason

  14. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    polars are just vector equations at heart :)

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i dont see that

  16. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    r = magnitude; <cos,sin> are the components

  17. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    r<cos(t),sin(t)> is the basi set up

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    those are the cartesian components you mean

  19. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    in the plane, yes

  20. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    but polars define length(r) whih is the magnitude of a vector; and the <cos,sin> angles are the x and y components of a vector

  21. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    a vector function simply defines a curve or surface generated by the parametric equations for the vector components from teh origin

  22. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    and that is all a polar equation is

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    come again, parametric equation for the vector components (the cartesian components?)

  24. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    (r,t) is a polar equation right? (radius,theta) this tells you how far to turn and how far to move

  25. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    thats all a vector is; an arrow indicating direction and length

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok , lets use th for theta

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok , so say again your statement

  28. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    which one lol

  29. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    r<cos(th),sin(th)> is the vector equivalent of a polar equation (r,th)

  30. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    or simpy <r cos(th), r sin(th)>

  31. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    vector , as in the cartesian components of the vector

  32. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes

  33. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    the point P(x,y) is the same as defining a vector from the origin as <x,y>

  34. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    the vector is an arrow pointing to the point

  35. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    right, that sometimes confuses me

  36. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    we write < x,y> for a vector, and P(x,y) for a point

  37. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    sometimes they write a vector as v(x,y) which confuses tha tmatter; i prefer the convention of just making it pointy to indicate its an arrow :)

  38. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    right, i like to distinguish between points (n tuples) and vectors

  39. myininaya
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    cantorset i posted a proof for your viewing sorry it took me awhile to respond

  40. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    i cant find it, one sec

  41. myininaya
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    k

  42. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.