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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

how do i write a absolute value equation? absolute value equations are the ones shaped as a v, right?

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    With these: | |

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thanx :) how abt this. so basically i need to write an absolute value equation for something that the vertex is at (-2.5, 18.5) and has a slope of 1. how do i write that?

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    y=|(x+2.5)| + 18.5

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thanks a million tropical33!!!!!!!!!!!

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    another q: with that equation (and in general) how would i figure out how to domain for a piecewise funciton?

  6. shadowfiend
    • 5 years ago
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    Btw, remember to give a medal if someone is helpful :)

  7. shadowfiend
    • 5 years ago
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    The domain of a piecewise function is basically all the values for which the piecewise function is specified. So if a piecewise function is valued 1 between 0 and 1, and 2 between 1 and 2, then the domain is 0 to 2. If you post an example we can walk through it.

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    how do i give someone a medal. the equation is y=|x+2.5|+18.5 I want it to only go up to 20 on the y axis and in bwtn -4 and -1

  9. shadowfiend
    • 5 years ago
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    Click `Good Answer' to the right of their name in the replies :) Ok, so if it only exists between -4 and -1, then that's the domain of the function :)

  10. shadowfiend
    • 5 years ago
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    The domain of the function is every x value for which you want your function to exist (or, more precisely, for which your function *does* exist).

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so i just write \[-4\le x \le -1\]

  12. shadowfiend
    • 5 years ago
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    You got it :)

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thanx a million!!!!!!! sorry to bother everyone again but... is this the right equation? if i want an upside down abs value thing, with a slope of 3/2 the vertex is (2,20) i would write it y=-|3/2x+2|+20 ?

  14. shadowfiend
    • 5 years ago
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    I don't have time right this second to draw it out and check it :/ But! Try posting it as a separate question on the left; hopefully amistre or someone else will be able to spot-check it faster than I can.

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thx a million for all ur help!!!!!!!!!!

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