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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

does anyone know what the general terms of this sequence is 3,6,10,15

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    lol can you help me

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    sorry i didnt got you

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    it is a arithmetic sequence with a twist.

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so how do i do it

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    how does each sequence differs

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    it increase by one each time so ,2,3,4,5

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    now what do i do

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    do you know the form for an arithmetic sequence?

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    no

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ok ill give you the form for that and then you can try to relate it to this problem. \[\sum_{n=1}^{N}n=N*(N+1)/2\]

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    let me know if that's enough to get you started

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    what does n represent

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    n is just an integer. in the sum if you have N=3 you get 1+2+3=6= (3*4/2)

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    can you these formulas for series?

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes it will help you find a general form for this series in terms of n where n represents with term in the series you are at.

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    do we alway use this formula for finding the general term

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    no not always

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    are you looking for the series(sum) or sequence?

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    for the series

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i just want a quick way of figuring out the general term

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    instead of keep guessing

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    lets break the terms into sums 1+2 1+2+3 1+2+3+4 ... so if n denotes the term we have \[\sum_{i=1}^{n+1}i=(n+1)*(n+2)/2=(n^{2}+3n+2)/2\]

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so n=1: (1+3+2)/2=3 you can check the other terms if you want

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    is there a a better way of figuring this out so you can avoid fractions in the general term

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    this is the simplest way I know to do it.

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    okay ty

  29. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yep, hope it helped a bit :)

  30. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yah it did ty

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