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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

how do you figure an original price if you are 180$ less than the original price after it has been decreased by 20% twice.

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  1. Owlfred
    • 5 years ago
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    Hoot! You just asked your first question! Hang tight while I find people to answer it for you. You can thank people who give you good answers by clicking the 'Good Answer' button on the right!

  2. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    20% twice eh... gotta read the whole thing

  3. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    180 = P(1 - .2)^2 180 ----- = P perhaps? (.8)^2 180/.64 = 281.25 ; lets test that

  4. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    281.25(.8) =225 225(.8) = 180

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    they say the answer is 500 If I reduce 500 by 20% twice I get 180. but I can do the reverse?

  6. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    ...... lets see what they are talking about then 500*.8 = 400 ... i dont see it as 500

  7. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    500*.2 = 100 and at best that gets you to 300

  8. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    Original Price (.8) = sale price at 20% 0ff

  9. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    if its marked down twice from the original price wed still be less than 500

  10. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    Original Price(.6) = 40% off original and thats 300 at best

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    500x.20=100 500-100=400 400x.20=80 400-80=320 320+180=500 ...how do I do it in reverse if all I know is the price was reduce 180$ after been decreased by 20% twice.

  12. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    Price paid -------------- = Original Price (1- %)^how often 180 -------- = 281.25 (1 - .2)^2

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I have no idea what that means/ sorry

  14. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    ... which part?

  15. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    Do you know how much was paid?

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    no only reduce by 180$ after 20% decrease twice

  17. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    ohhh; i read it wrong... I thought 180 was the amount paid....

  18. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    P(.2) = Amount reduced Amount reduced(.2) = 180 is what yor looking for right?

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    the amount was reduce twice by 20% ??? was reduced by 180$ what the original amount

  20. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    close to it

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    What does this symbol mean ^

  22. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    its how you indicate an exponent on a keyboard

  23. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    it point up to tell you the number is a little higher

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    OH

  25. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    3^2 = 9

  26. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    A{n} = A{n-1} - A{n-1}(.2) A{n-1} = A{n-2}(.2) - A{n-2}(.2)(.2) maybe

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Thanks but it just doesn't make any sense

  28. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    its a work in progress :) but I think I narrowed it down tho this:

  29. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    Po(.2) = %off1 Po(.8) = saleprice saleprice(.2) = %off 2 %off1 + %off2 = 180

  30. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    Po(.2) + Po(.8)(.2) = 180 Po(.2 + .16) = 180 Po = 180/(.36) maybe?

  31. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    Po = 180/.36 = 500

  32. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    were did the .36 com from

  33. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    .2 + .16 = .36

  34. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    First step; lets agree that the steps I took are valid.. Po(.2) = %off1 agree?

  35. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes

  36. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    Po(.8) = sale price sale price (.2) = %off2 agree?

  37. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    OK

  38. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    %off1 + %off2 = 180 Po(.2) + Po(.8)(.2) = 180 agree?

  39. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes

  40. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    Po(.2) + Po(.16) = 180 Po(.2 + .16) = 180 Po(.36) = 180 agree?

  41. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    where did the .16 come from

  42. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    .8 times .2 = .16

  43. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    Po(.8)(.2) = Po(.16)

  44. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    how would I know to do that.....makes no sense

  45. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    .......... I really cant step this down much further. You know that Po(.8) = sale price ; and also that sale price(.2) = %off2 So we put that all together to get: Po(.8)(.2) = Po(.16)

  46. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    looks like a lot of people like your help, amistre can you help with my trignometric substitution problem?

  47. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    I can try :)

  48. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    cool meet you there, thanks so much

  49. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thanks sorry to hold you to long

  50. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    'sok.... the math keeps :)

  51. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    do you see how it works thru that? all we did was define our steps, then added the Po to it to keep track of the 'original price'

  52. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    if we know how the original price plays a part in this; we can solve for it

  53. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    when I add the % I total 100%. never though of multiply them...still don;t know why you would mulitpy them

  54. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    Po(.8) = sale price ; sale price (.2) = %off2 ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ this part is redundant so remove it Po(.8)(.2) = %0ff2

  55. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    my test says the answer is 500=original price

  56. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    your test is correct.... why? because 180/.36 = 500

  57. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    Po(.8)(.2) = Po(.16) = %off2

  58. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    Po(.2) = %off1 Po(.16) = %off2 %off1 + %off2 = 180 Po(.2) + Po(.16) = 180

  59. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I see... 20% off the first time and 16% off the second time.....I would of never figured that out?????

  60. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    its not really 16% off :) Its just that that what it amounts to to figure this out ;)

  61. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    actually, your spot on it lol

  62. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    How about another one,,, ticket sales have gone up 10% reaching 880 tickets how many ticket were sold in the last season. my answer is 792 but its wrong

  63. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    wish I could try it, but library is closing...good luck :)

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