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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

volume of cylindrical shells (calculus): y^2=x, x=2y rotate about y axis

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    bro whats the base equation again, something like pi int .... of the derivative squared?

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    idk if that matters

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i have my integral calculus last semester.

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    y=+or- sqrtx , y=x/2 to make it simpler

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    come on guys, this isnt that hard.

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    wait for a while, i'm solving it.

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    what is really the given? it is lacking.

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thats it

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    really?

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    "find the volume of the solid obtained by rotating the regions bounded by the curves about the specified line.

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    you have to find the point where the two curves meet, and then solve the integral from 0 to that point

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    they meet at (0,0)

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    got it.

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thats one yes, and then they cross again

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    the answer is

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    8pi over 3

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    where do the two curves cross?

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    the limits are 0 and 2.

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    how

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    just substitute x=y^2 to x=2y that will become, y^2-2y=0 y(y-2)=0 y=0 y=2

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    okay, let me double check now

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i had a mistake, the answer must be 10pi/3

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    almost have it

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    okay, i have the solution but i have a hard time encoding it.

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    whats (2^1.5)/(2/3) -1

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i dont have my calculator :/

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    3.242640687

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    okay thats what i got... where did you get pi from?

  29. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    im looking in the back of the book for the answer to see whos right.

  30. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    2pi integral of (x^1/2-x/2)dx 2pi (x^3/2)/(3/2)-x^2/4, substitute x=2 2pi(2^3/2)(2/3)-2^2/4 2pi(4(2/3)-1) 2pi(8/3 - 1) 2 pi (5/3) (10pi)/3

  31. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    okay i did it waaaay wrong haha

  32. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    back of the book says 64pi/15

  33. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    is it correct now?

  34. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    is it the answer on the book?

  35. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    64pi/15, so its close

  36. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    okay im too tired for this, thanks for the help

  37. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    you are welcome, actually i can explain it, i think i just miss some terms in my solution. by the way, do you have skype account?

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