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smurfy14

  • 5 years ago

True or False?? File attached! (Please show how you know if its true/false)

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  1. smurfy14
    • 5 years ago
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  2. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    1st is true

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i dont think the first is true amistre it should be 9/x^3

  4. smurfy14
    • 5 years ago
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    rsvitale i think youre right about number one

  5. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    you might be right :) without () around it count it as seperate right..

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    66. false 67. true by distributive property. (-1/6)*(x^2+3x) 68. false you're only multiplying the top by 5 it should be 5x^2/6 69. false you need to divide the first term by 3y as well 70. false 71.false same reasoning as 70. I can explain these if you want. 72.true x^2-8x+16=(x-4)^2. then take the square root. 73.true ln(e^2)=2ln(e) 74.false e^(l+s)=(e^l)*(e^s)

  7. smurfy14
    • 5 years ago
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    wow lol ok lets start with 67...why did you multiply by -1/6?

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    70 and 71: assume sqrt(x+y)=sqrt(x)+sqrt(y) square both sides x+y=x+2sqrt(x)*sqrt(y)+y this is not true unless x,y, or both are 0 so the equality cannot be true

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    dividing by -6 is the same as multiplying by (-1/6)

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    dividing by anything is the same as multiplying by its inverse.

  11. smurfy14
    • 5 years ago
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    ok gotcha

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    inverse as in 1/something, not the technical definition of inverse

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    do the other ones make sense?

  14. smurfy14
    • 5 years ago
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    ok and well im still going down the list trying to see if i get it. are you sure 73 is true? b/isnt 2lne not the same thing as just 2 by itself?

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    2lne=2. the equality is ln(e^2)=2 ln(e^2)=2ln(e)=2. ln(e)=1

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    e to what power=e? e^1=e

  17. smurfy14
    • 5 years ago
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    oh ok for some reason i thought lne^2=1

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    no ln(e^2) means e to what power is e^2. so it is 2.

  19. smurfy14
    • 5 years ago
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    ok so if i said e^27 it would be 27 correct?

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ln(e^27)=27 correct

  21. smurfy14
    • 5 years ago
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    ok and i dont get the last one

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    (e^l)^(s)=e^(l*s) not e^(l+s)

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    do you want me to explain why?

  24. smurfy14
    • 5 years ago
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    but i thought when you multiply exponents you add them like (x^5)(x^3)=x^8

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yeah that is right. But you are multiplying e^l by itself s times. (e^l)^s=(e^l)*(e^l)*(e^l)*....*(e^l) <---- s times =e^(l+l+l+l....+l <---s times)= e^(l*s)

  26. smurfy14
    • 5 years ago
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    oohhh ok i get it!! well thanks so much for your help!!

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    you're welcome :)

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