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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

can i get an example for a problem of solving an absolute value equation, please?

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  1. Owlfred
    • 5 years ago
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    Hoot! You just asked your first question! Hang tight while I find people to answer it for you. You can thank people who give you good answers by clicking the 'Good Answer' button on the right!

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    the absolute value of x is 6. so x could be either 6 or -6

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    \[|x-3|=5\] \[x-3=5\] \[x-3=-5\] \[x-3=5 , x=8\] \[x-3=-5, x=-2\]

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    there are two. do you have one you would like to do?

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yeah, the |x-3| = 5 one.

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    the problem is, I don't quite remember how to do the process. Could one help.

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    just remember when you remove the absolute value signs you have to write two separate equations

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    this is clear yes? because if i know \[|x|=78\] then x could be 78 but it could also be -78

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yeah, I just looked that up, and it made sense. Now what if there's two variables, like |x-3| = 5, would the answer be, "2 or -2" ?

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    oh no

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    what? why?

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    because if i know |x-3|=5 then what i know is that either x-3=5 or x-3=-5

  13. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    the solution to the first one is x = 8, not x = 2. the solution to the second one IS x=-2

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Ok. I kind of see what you did... Could you give me another one amongst those lines, so I can try it?

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    sure try |x+3|=7

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    The answer to the first one should be 4, and the second one, being (|x+3| = -7) would be -10?

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    yes . got it. write to equations, solve each individually

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i meant write TWO equations

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Yeah, for sure! (: It's just I'm a bit slow at first, but once I get it, I beast through all of them, lol. Btw, are there any equations like that, with THREE variables?

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    not usually. do you have one?

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    No, I just wanted to know so I could be prepared in case I get one of those.

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    you could have something like this: |x+2|=2x-5

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    and how would you solve that?

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    in which case you still have to write two equations but you have to be very very careful

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    you would write two equations. one would be: x+2=2x-5

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    the other would be: x+2=-(2x-5)

  27. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    which of course means x+2=-2x+5

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    be careful when you take the negative to remember to put it in parentheses

  29. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    alright, and so from there, what step is next?

  30. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    just solve like any linear equation. \[x+2=2x-5\] \[2+5=2x-x\] \[7=x\]

  31. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    or \[x+2=-(2x-5)\] \[x+2=-2x+5\] \[x+2x=5-2\] \[3x=3\] \[x=1\]

  32. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    OH, OK!

  33. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    hey do you have time, ? because i have another question...

  34. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    and btw, thanks a lot.

  35. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    AWH, no satellite, dont forsake me right now! I got aaaaaa big TEST tomorrow!

  36. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    one more and then i turn into a pumpkin

  37. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    what's that mean?

  38. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    go ahead and ask

  39. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    never saw or read cinderella?

  40. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    oh, yeah, aha.... but its only 10:44, doesn't that happen at 12?

  41. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    eastern standard time

  42. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Interesting. Ok, anyways, sorry for delaying your transformation, but could you give me some heads up on solving prequalities?

  43. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ?? ptequalities?

  44. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    even spell check doesn't like that

  45. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I don't know, the weird lady put one of the subjects we need to study, under "Solving prequaltities and graphing solution." Any ideas?

  46. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    sorry never heard of them.

  47. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    google hasn't either so i don't feel bad

  48. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Yeah, it doesn't even show up on google. !

  49. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Alright, well, you've been of great help! And I appreciate it. Thank you, who ever you are, and have a good one!

  50. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    gnight.

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