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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

By what mechanism water moves from soil to the plant leaves?

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  1. Owlfred
    • 5 years ago
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    Hoot! You just asked your first question! Hang tight while I find people to answer it for you. You can thank people who give you good answers by clicking the 'Good Answer' button on the right!

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Plants absorb nutrients and water through their roots, but photosynthesis — the process by which plants create their fuel — occurs in the leaves. Therefore, plants need to get fluids and nutrients from the ground up through their stems to their parts that are above ground level

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    photosynthesis

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Thanks terbear21. I understand that. I want to know the mechanism by which water moves from the soil, up to the leaves? Like in real life we need a electric pump to move water from a well to a tank above, or water evaporates from the surface of the sea due to sun's heat to form clouds. So what is the mechanism that moves water from the soil to the leaves?

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Water will always move toward a site with lower water potential, which is a measure of the chemical free energy of water. By definition, pure water has a water potential of 0 MegaPascals (MPa). In contrast, at 20 percent relative humidity, the water potential of the atmosphere is -500 MPa. This difference signifies that water will tend to evaporate into the atmosphere. The water within plants also has a negative potential, indicating water will tend to evaporate into the air from the leaf. The leaves of crop plants often function at -1 MPa, and some desert plants can tolerate leaf water potentials as low as -10 MPa. The water in plants can exist at such low water potentials due to the cohesive forces of water molecules. The chemical structure of water molecules is such that they cohere very strongly. By the cohesion-tension theory, when sunlight strikes a leaf, the resultant evaporation first causes a drop in leaf water potential. This causes water to move from stem to leaf, lowering the water potential in the stem, which in turn causes water to move from root to stem, and soil to root. This serves to pull water up through the xylem tissue of the plant.

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    its called The Cohesion-Tension Theory The major mechanism for long-distance water transport is described by the cohesion-tension theory, whereby the driving force of transport is transpiration, that is, the evaporation of water from the leaf surfaces. Water molecules cohere (stick together), and are pulled up the plant by the tension, or pulling force, exerted by evaporation at the leaf surface.

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    miss understood the question

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Thanks Terbear21

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    anytime

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