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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

what is the gauss's law

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  1. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    The total of the electric flux out of a closed surface is equal to the charge enclosed divided by the permittivity.

  2. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    \[\phi=Q/\epsilon0\]

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    im in 9th class could you make it simpler

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    do u know about charge, permittivity and electric flux?

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    not one bit

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    den u r too young to understand gauss law :)

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i know im reading feynman's lectures on physics and it's confusing

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    jst google abt flux, permittivity n electric charge.. u mite get a view

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    allright will do it thanks anyway

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    How well do you know your calculus? If you can manage being able to do even some remedial differential or integral calculus, then you'll be able to handle at least the basics of Gauss' Law. Also, you are going to need to know how to do use vector addition in order to be able to understand this theory more thoroughly. (Really, you need to know how to do calculus with vectors not just for being able to use Guass's law, but for a plethora of other physical concepts. You should learn these things before you really even start Newtonian mechanics.) The integral form of Guass' Law is as follows: \[\Phi=\int\limits_{}E^\rightarrow*dA^\rightarrow\]E is the representing the sum of the flux which is proportional to the charge enclosed and dA is the area enclosed. NOTE: Just in case you're not familiar with vectors, that is not read as E multiplied by dA, but is to be read as E (dot) dA. It's a dot product that you have to find using vector addition. Also, the integration is of a closed surface so the integrand should have a little ring in the middle of it. It can also be rewritten as\[\Phi=Q/\epsilon_0\]Where \[Q\] is the charge enclosed and\[\epsilon_0\]is the Permittivity Constant which is equal to 8.85×10^-12. With these ingredients, you should be able to look at some basic Guass' law problems for further analysis. Again, if you're not comfortable with the math, start doing your research in learning calculus and vectors.

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