myininaya
  • myininaya
find the three consecutive integers such that the square of the largest exceeds the sum of the quarters of the squares of the other two by 12
Mathematics
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SOLVED
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katieb
  • katieb
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myininaya
  • myininaya
i don't get it i cannot get an integer x x+2 x+4 (x+4)^2=1/4*x^2+1/4*(x+2)^2+12 is what i did and got x^2+14x+6=0
myininaya
  • myininaya
i cannot get an integer from x^2+14x+6=0
radar
  • radar
Let x = first integer then x+1 = second integer and x+2 = third integer ((x+1)/4)^2 +(x^2)/4=(x+2)^2 + 12

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radar
  • radar
Problem does not say even or odd just consecutive
myininaya
  • myininaya
oops i mean even intgers sorry
myininaya
  • myininaya
find the first three consecutive even integers
radar
  • radar
O.K that does change things lol
myininaya
  • myininaya
ignore the first three lol i was trying to do this problem for someone else who asked it earlier but the above is the only way i could translate it
radar
  • radar
Let 2x = first even integer then 2x+2 = second and 2x+4 = third
anonymous
  • anonymous
no such integers exist
myininaya
  • myininaya
thats what i was thinking so why would they asked this question
anonymous
  • anonymous
either you typed the question out incorrectly or they didn't check their solutions thoroughly
myininaya
  • myininaya
well there is no way for me to know if the question is typed incorrectly or not i was trying to answer this same question earlier from someone else who posted it on openstudy i typed it exactly as he did
myininaya
  • myininaya
without the word even lol
anonymous
  • anonymous
ah, okay. it will suffice to say there's no solution
myininaya
  • myininaya
i just thought they wouldn't try to trick pre algebra peeps so i was like i had to be misunderstanding or the question was typed incorrectly thanks jamesm
radar
  • radar
My solution was not an integer. I can't work it!
myininaya
  • myininaya
thanks radar
radar
  • radar
I too, wonder why such a problem was assigned, sure doesn't reinforce confidence!
myininaya
  • myininaya
i think it is possible that the person did not write it correctly
radar
  • radar
Ah so.
myininaya
  • myininaya
but i did ask if he wrote it word from word and he said yes so maybe not idk
anonymous
  • anonymous
is it possible that they meant 15 and not 12? 15 yields integer solutions
myininaya
  • myininaya
hmm.. maybe he is still here i will ask about the 15

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