A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • 5 years ago

How many ounces of a 22% alcohol solution must be mixed with 23 ounces of a 5% solution to produce a 10% alcohol solution? Round to the nearest tenth of an ounce. Can somebody explain how to do this problem?

  • This Question is Closed
  1. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    i can do it; but splaining it might be a challenge :)

  2. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    a + 23 = total amount of liquid a(.22) +23(.05) = (a+23)(.10) .22a + 1.15 = .10a + 2.3 .12a = 2.30 - 1.15 = 1.15 a = 1.15/.12 = 115/12 = 9.5833....

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    trying it...

  4. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    That got the right answer...and your equation does make sense to me...I got the stuff on the left side of the equal sign right, but had messed up on the right side of the equal sign. I had .10x on the right side. Can you explain why this was wrong, and I needed your a+23 times .1Ox? :P

  5. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    times just .10, that is

  6. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    a+23 is the total amont of the , im assuming liguid, that the system holds. so (total amount) * (.10) gives us the volume of solution and % content

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Ah. I guess I just had the % content on the right side, and did not have the amount times .1 to give me the volume...

  8. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    the amount of 23 was stated inte problem

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I know....I hope I can remember your equations for these type of problems, for my math test tomorrow. :)

  10. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    the are all of a basic form: amount(%) of one item + amount(%) of another item = total amount(%) of ending item

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I'm copying this now and saving it...:)

  12. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    if amount is money, we get interest

  13. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    20(.05) + 30(.10) = 50(x)

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I'm actually good at simple interest problems...:)

  15. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    then consider these simple interests problems :)

  16. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    $a(.22) + $23(.05) = $(a+23)(.10)

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Uh...the problem of relating simple interest to mixture problems for me...is that I actually have a little diagram circle that I write and label to help me with simple interest problems...your above sentence is kinda confusing...without a story problem to go with it, that is...

  18. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    story problem then: if $23 is invested at 5%, how much money needs to be invested at 22% to get as much interest at a single account at 10%

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    That makes your equation make more sense to me..:)

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    But now the a+23 does not seem like it would equal a 'single account'...

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    maybe I'm thinking too hard...

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    :P

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I guess I'm stuck on, just doing the .1 times something, would equal a 'single account' or the 'final solution'...

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    that tends to be my train of thought right now, for some reason..

  25. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Bu t thanks anyway. :)

  26. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.