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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

Why is the vertex or parabola y=(x-3)^2+2 (3, 2)?

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  1. Owlfred
    • 5 years ago
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    Hoot! You just asked your first question! Hang tight while I find people to answer it for you. You can thank people who give you good answers by clicking the 'Good Answer' button on the right!

  2. smurfy14
    • 5 years ago
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    youre correct the answer is (3,2)

  3. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    But Why?

  4. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    becasue the definition of vertex is where the bend cuts the axis at

  5. smurfy14
    • 5 years ago
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    oh sorry i thought it said what. because whenever you have a parabola equation you take the number in () which is -3 and change the sign and leave the number outside of () which is 2 the same so it would be 3,2

  6. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    the vertex is halfway between the foci and the directix; so its the shortest distance between them and lies on the axis of symmetry

  7. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I understand that when x=3 the y would be 2 but how would you get the 3 other than just trying to make the 3 to 0?

  8. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Sorry if my question is sort of confusing. I'm asking more for the concept behind it.

  9. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    the concept is a geometric one

  10. smurfy14
    • 5 years ago
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    that is just how the formula works. whatever # is after x is just the oppisite there isnt really a reson behind it you just kind of have to do it.

  11. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    okay thank your for your help; both of you. Is there any way for me to give you a rating of some sort? I'm sorry, this is my first time here.

  12. smurfy14
    • 5 years ago
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    you just click the blue "good answer" by our names :) and no problem

  13. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    hit f5 to refresh your browser and you should see a 'good answer' button next to our names

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    here is an idea.

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    the smallest \[x^2\] can be is 0

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    it is 0 if x = 0

  17. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    the smallest \[(x-3)^2\] can be is zero and it is zero if x = 3

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    so the smallest \[(x-3)^2+2\] can be is 2, and it is 2 if x = 3 that is why the vertex is (2,3)

  19. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    28 to go lardamercy!

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    thank you Satellite

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    welcome

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    hello myininaya

  23. myininaya
    • 5 years ago
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    hey :) i'm thinking about showing him something once i figure out if i can do this something that i'm about to do i know that made no sense lol

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    right! this vertex stuff is not as hard as it is made out to be. i can show it to people who know basically no math at all. now i am going to take my measly less than half of amistre's medals (jealous, me?) and go to bed. some people have to work

  25. myininaya
    • 5 years ago
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    lol later

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