anonymous
  • anonymous
Can somebody explain how to simplify this expression? Negative 2y to the negative 1 power, all inside parentheses, with a negative 2 exponent outside the parentheses.
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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amistre64
  • amistre64
using math notation for staters
amistre64
  • amistre64
\[(-2y^{-1})^{-2}\]
amistre64
  • amistre64
this?

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amistre64
  • amistre64
\[-2^{-2} y^2\] \[-\frac{y^2}{4}\] maybe?
radar
  • radar
Is it still a minus (if it was inside the paren)?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes, you set it up right, amistre.
radar
  • radar
I suspect the answer may be \[y ^{2}\over 4\]
radar
  • radar
Maybe amisstrte64 will come back and verify his answer.
anonymous
  • anonymous
I think it is 4y^2
anonymous
  • anonymous
...because it looks like this is the expression... (-2y^-1)^-2 Multiplying exponents (-2y)^2 Expanding brackets 4y^2
radar
  • radar
I went this direction, but I do see your logic. I may have violated order of operations:\[(-2y ^{-1})^{-2}\] to:\[1\over (-2y ^{-1})^{2}\]then to:\[1\over 4 y ^{-2}\] finally\[y ^{2}\over 4\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
\[(-2y^{-1})^{-2}=(-2)^{-2}y^2=\frac{y^2}{(-2)^2}=\frac{y^2}{4}\]\]
radar
  • radar
Help me out here satellite73
anonymous
  • anonymous
if that was the problem to beginwith
anonymous
  • anonymous
we get \[\frac{y^2}{4}\] yes?
anonymous
  • anonymous
hello radar! here to celebrate amistre's 1000 medal
radar
  • radar
that is what i got, amistre got a -y^2/4
anonymous
  • anonymous
hope it is soon cause i got to run
radar
  • radar
before you run look at gianfranco solution above, what is wrong with that approach beside getting a different answer???
anonymous
  • anonymous
well if the question is as he wrote it, you have to raise (-2) to the power of -2, not the same as \[-2^{-2}\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
you should get a 4 in the denominator
anonymous
  • anonymous
gianfraco was acting as if it was \[((-2y)^{-1})^{-2}\]
anonymous
  • anonymous
but that is now how i read the problem. i read it as only the y being raised to the power of -1. if there were no parentheses that is what it means
anonymous
  • anonymous
i read it the way you did
radar
  • radar
I can see that that would make a difference.
anonymous
  • anonymous
of course. like the difference between \[(2\times 3)^2\] and \[2\times 3^2\]
radar
  • radar
Understand. Thanks for clearing up a few things.
anonymous
  • anonymous
O never mind everybody..I think I've figured it out.
radar
  • radar
I was hoping you would

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