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anonymous

  • 5 years ago

Can somebody explain how to simplify this expression? Negative 2y to the negative 1 power, all inside parentheses, with a negative 2 exponent outside the parentheses.

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  1. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    using math notation for staters

  2. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    \[(-2y^{-1})^{-2}\]

  3. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    this?

  4. amistre64
    • 5 years ago
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    \[-2^{-2} y^2\] \[-\frac{y^2}{4}\] maybe?

  5. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    Is it still a minus (if it was inside the paren)?

  6. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    Yes, you set it up right, amistre.

  7. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    I suspect the answer may be \[y ^{2}\over 4\]

  8. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    Maybe amisstrte64 will come back and verify his answer.

  9. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    I think it is 4y^2

  10. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    ...because it looks like this is the expression... (-2y^-1)^-2 Multiplying exponents (-2y)^2 Expanding brackets 4y^2

  11. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    I went this direction, but I do see your logic. I may have violated order of operations:\[(-2y ^{-1})^{-2}\] to:\[1\over (-2y ^{-1})^{2}\]then to:\[1\over 4 y ^{-2}\] finally\[y ^{2}\over 4\]

  12. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    \[(-2y^{-1})^{-2}=(-2)^{-2}y^2=\frac{y^2}{(-2)^2}=\frac{y^2}{4}\]\]

  13. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    Help me out here satellite73

  14. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    if that was the problem to beginwith

  15. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    we get \[\frac{y^2}{4}\] yes?

  16. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    hello radar! here to celebrate amistre's 1000 medal

  17. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    that is what i got, amistre got a -y^2/4

  18. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    hope it is soon cause i got to run

  19. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    before you run look at gianfranco solution above, what is wrong with that approach beside getting a different answer???

  20. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    well if the question is as he wrote it, you have to raise (-2) to the power of -2, not the same as \[-2^{-2}\]

  21. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    you should get a 4 in the denominator

  22. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    gianfraco was acting as if it was \[((-2y)^{-1})^{-2}\]

  23. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    but that is now how i read the problem. i read it as only the y being raised to the power of -1. if there were no parentheses that is what it means

  24. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    i read it the way you did

  25. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    I can see that that would make a difference.

  26. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    of course. like the difference between \[(2\times 3)^2\] and \[2\times 3^2\]

  27. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    Understand. Thanks for clearing up a few things.

  28. anonymous
    • 5 years ago
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    O never mind everybody..I think I've figured it out.

  29. radar
    • 5 years ago
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    I was hoping you would

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