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dinainjune Group Title

anyone can help me with logarithm?

  • 3 years ago
  • 3 years ago

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  1. joemath314159 Group Title
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    What about logarithms?

    • 3 years ago
  2. bnut056 Group Title
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    ok whats the question

    • 3 years ago
  3. saifoo.khan Group Title
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    i can try.

    • 3 years ago
  4. Realstrongguy Group Title
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    i can

    • 3 years ago
  5. dinainjune Group Title
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    this is the question

    • 3 years ago
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  6. saifoo.khan Group Title
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    0.323

    • 3 years ago
  7. kanade Group Title
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    logarthims usually have a base like:\[\log_{10} 2\]

    • 3 years ago
  8. kanade Group Title
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    where 10 is a base

    • 3 years ago
  9. kanade Group Title
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    since there is no base im assuming that they are the same. then you can use rules of logarithems

    • 3 years ago
  10. kanade Group Title
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    http://www.purplemath.com/modules/logrules.htm gives an overview of the log rules that you can use

    • 3 years ago
  11. dinainjune Group Title
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    4 or 8 is the base. the example like this \[^{4} \log_{3} \]

    • 3 years ago
  12. kanade Group Title
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    ? do you mean \[\log_{3} 4\]

    • 3 years ago
  13. joemath314159 Group Title
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    Wrote out a solution, posting in a sec

    • 3 years ago
  14. joemath314159 Group Title
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    You can simplify the denominator a lot to look like the numerator, and all the logs cancel out leaving a fraction

    • 3 years ago
  15. joemath314159 Group Title
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    I work with the denominator first and simplify as much as i can, then i look at the fraction as a whole.

    • 3 years ago
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  16. Evern Group Title
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    all the logarithms are of the same base... so that doesn't need to be changed then look at the arguments of the log function .Notice that alot of them are multiples of 3.Using the basic log rules that joe gave you a link to.convert all the arguments to either 2 or 3. cancel out the 4log3 types terms.....giving you (log2 +log3)/(16log2+16log3)

    • 3 years ago
  17. dinainjune Group Title
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    @kanade no, it's \[^{4} \log_{3} \] like \[^{10}\log_{10} \] Thank you! i got it now

    • 3 years ago
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