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physics_era Group Title

which aspect os light is more prominenet? particle or wave

  • 3 years ago
  • 3 years ago

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  1. wklock Group Title
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    wave

    • 3 years ago
  2. wklock Group Title
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    i think

    • 3 years ago
  3. Marianne Group Title
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    Actually, it's both. In some experiments, you can interpret light as a beam of particles to explain the results (eg, when studying mirrors or lenses). In others, regarding difraction for example you cannot. Picture light as little balls going through a slot, under certain conditions this balls will appear in places that you wouldn't expect. Try using a laser and thin slot to see a difraction patern and you'll get the idea.

    • 3 years ago
  4. 3rd_egg Group Title
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    It's called duality. No one ever saw a light particle but some experiments prove it acts like a particle, other prove it acts like a wave (both very interesting experiments, great read).

    • 3 years ago
  5. arimus Group Title
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    Like Marianne said, it is both. If this question relates to a specific experiment then the answer depends on the perameters of that experiment. A difraction expirament will show that light is clearly a wave, while low-energy packet emmisions will show that it is clearly a particle.

    • 3 years ago
  6. laserdude Group Title
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    it largely depends on what experiment you are using to determine it.

    • 3 years ago
  7. physics_era Group Title
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    thnx to all of u

    • 3 years ago
  8. nddyck Group Title
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    Its probably neither. We like to throw things in with previous groups but the fact is light is really different from anything else.

    • 3 years ago
  9. physics_era Group Title
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    exactly u r rite...

    • 3 years ago
  10. zmuc Group Title
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    wave...thats it

    • 3 years ago
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