Quantcast

Got Homework?

Connect with other students for help. It's a free community.

  • across
    MIT Grad Student
    Online now
  • laura*
    Helped 1,000 students
    Online now
  • Hero
    College Math Guru
    Online now

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

iumom Group Title

Newton's second law: I'm I right that a bowling ball and a tennis ball fall at the same rate because of the force of gravity and the mass of the two objects does not matter?

  • 3 years ago
  • 3 years ago

  • This Question is Closed
  1. stan Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    From the universal law of gravitation\[F _{g} = ma = GM _{earth} m/r^{2} \]Notice that the mass of the object, m, cancels leaving\[a = GM _{earth} /r^{2} =g\]

    • 3 years ago
  2. TomLikesPhysics Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    You are right - but keep in mind that you are neglecting air-drag (which is often the case and not). On the moon there is no air-drag - therefore a feather and hammer touch the ground at the same time if the fall from the same height - proof -> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Apollo_15_feather_and_hammer_drop.ogg - pretty cool huh? ;) seeing is believing

    • 3 years ago
  3. Zivko Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    What about the other object (Earth,Moon...)? Don't they accelarate towards the 'falling body' as well? In that case, mass of the 'falling object' does matter.

    • 3 years ago
  4. stan Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    The forces felt by each object is the same, namely Fg from above, but of course the accelerations felt are very different... a = F/m. Masses are different so the accelerations are different but the forces are the same. The mass of whatever body you are calculating the acceleration of is the one that doesn't matter in the calculation (cancels out)

    • 3 years ago
  5. Zivko Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Yes, but doesn't the Earth accelerates more towards the body with higher mass? Of course, then we would have to drop one body at a time and I doubt that we could measure the difference. But, exactly speaking, Earth will meet with higher mass object sooner.

    • 3 years ago
  6. stan Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    the point is that it doesn't accelerate at a rate which depends it ITS mass

    • 3 years ago
  7. efreny12 Group Title
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    this was Galileo's theory no Newton.

    • 2 years ago
    • Attachments:

See more questions >>>

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.