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123goldie Group Title

How do you complete the square?

  • 2 years ago
  • 2 years ago

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  1. gandalfwiz Group Title
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    with lines

    • 2 years ago
  2. 123goldie Group Title
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    I mean with like quadratic equations...

    • 2 years ago
  3. Harkirat Group Title
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    u add square of half the coefficient of x to both sides.....

    • 2 years ago
  4. Harkirat Group Title
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    if u give a question I can explain..

    • 2 years ago
  5. 123goldie Group Title
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    Got it!

    • 2 years ago
  6. Harkirat Group Title
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    good for u then....☺

    • 2 years ago
  7. amistre64 Group Title
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    in algebra we are given an equation; quadratic in nature usually; and in order to "complete the square" we can look to geometry: for instance: x^2 +6x + ??? completes the square set it up like this \begin{array}c &&&6/2\ xs\\ &x^2&x&x&x\\ &x&1&2&3\\ 6/2\ xs&x&4&5&6\\ &x&7&8&9\\ \end{array} it take an additional 9 pieces to "complete" the square

    • 2 years ago
  8. amistre64 Group Title
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    while the geometry is useful to describe what a "complete square" square is; it impractical to use all the time; so we take our lead from it and abstractly construct our square with half of our "x" coefficient; and square it

    • 2 years ago
  9. Diogo Group Title
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    example: you have x^2 + 10x + C you want to find C. just simply solve this equation: \[10x = 2x*\sqrt{C}\] i mean, you have to match the second term with this expression ( 2x*sqrt(C) )

    • 2 years ago
  10. Diogo Group Title
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    it will give you C = 25. Thats the number you were looking for ;)

    • 2 years ago
  11. Diogo Group Title
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    I've found this out by myself when i was in college. It was very useful for my advanced math classes

    • 2 years ago
  12. Diogo Group Title
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    I've found this out by myself when i was in college. It was very useful for my advanced math classes

    • 2 years ago
  13. Harkirat Group Title
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    25 = 5² which is square of half of the coefficient of x as I said !!!

    • 2 years ago
  14. Diogo Group Title
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    well.. here is the proof of what you said then. only words doesnt mean anything :p

    • 2 years ago
  15. gandalfwiz Group Title
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    could I have another example?

    • 2 years ago
  16. gandalfwiz Group Title
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    Just to get it in my brain :)

    • 2 years ago
  17. amistre64 Group Title
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    abstract: ax^2 +bx +c c = (b/2)^2

    • 2 years ago
  18. Diogo Group Title
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    x^2 + 4x + C 4x = 2x*sqrt(C) 2 = sqrt(C) C = 4 so: x^2 + 4x + 4 = perfect square

    • 2 years ago
  19. amistre64 Group Title
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    thats if a=1 i believe

    • 2 years ago
  20. gandalfwiz Group Title
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    thnx!

    • 2 years ago
  21. 123goldie Group Title
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    Thanks guys!

    • 2 years ago
  22. amistre64 Group Title
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    no prob

    • 2 years ago
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