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Jessica_808

  • 4 years ago

What happens when you subtract a number from a negative number?

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  1. Animefreak_gal
    • 4 years ago
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    Any examples of what your talking. ~ I'm some how a bit confused.

  2. Jessica_808
    • 4 years ago
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    Oh! Um...like: -6-5=? I believe that it is -11. estudier helped me with that so I hope I remember it.

  3. Jessica_808
    • 4 years ago
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    Thank you for your concern though. That was kind of you. :)

  4. Animefreak_gal
    • 4 years ago
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    -6-5 would equal to -11 as you remembered.

  5. JonnyMcA
    • 4 years ago
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    If you subtract a number from a negative number, it just becomes even more negative. If you think of it as a number line from left to right, with negative numbers on the left, and positive on the right (with zero being teh middle), then if you subtract a number from another, then you move to the left a corresponding distance on that line. So -6 would be 6 spaces left of zero. If you subtract 5 from it, you move 5 more spaces to the left, and end up at -11.

  6. amistre64
    • 4 years ago
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    think of negative numbers as being in a hole; the more dirt you subtract from the hole, the deeper you go.

  7. gandalfwiz
    • 4 years ago
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    good explanation, amistre!

  8. Jessica_808
    • 4 years ago
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    Thank you for explaining :)

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