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apexsucks

  • 4 years ago

After being rearranged and simplified, which of the following equations could be solved using the quadratic formula? Check all that apply. A. 2x2 - 3x + 10 = 2x + 21 B. 2x2 - 6x - 7 = 2x2 C. 5x2 + 2x - 4 = 2x2 D. 5x3 - 3x + 10 = 2x2

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  1. robtobey
    • 4 years ago
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    A. and C. B. is linear and D. is a cubic

  2. mz11235
    • 4 years ago
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    can u explane plz...i want tolean this thing...quadratic formula..@robtobey

  3. SmoothMath
    • 4 years ago
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    I'll explain, bro.

  4. SmoothMath
    • 4 years ago
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    The quadratic formula is awesome. Basically the idea is that any polynomial where the highest exponent for x is 2, you can just plug the different coefficients into the formula, and it'll tell you what values of x make the polynomial 0. Now, the only trick is that if you have an equation like that, you have to put it in the form Ax^2 + Bx + C = 0. A, B, and C can be any constant numbers. As long as they aren't variables, you're good.

  5. mz11235
    • 4 years ago
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    thanks a lot@smoothmath

  6. SmoothMath
    • 4 years ago
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    Now, one thing... those coefficients are allowed to be 0.

  7. SmoothMath
    • 4 years ago
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    Well. As long as A isn't 0. Because in the quadratic, then you would divide by 0. But B or C can be. Just be aware of that.

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