Quantcast

A community for students. Sign up today!

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

manoranjan

  • 3 years ago

What is the most stable geometrical figure in 3 dimensions ?

  • This Question is Closed
  1. saifoo.khan
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Pyramid i guess.

  2. manoranjan
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I was wondering why ?

  3. saifoo.khan
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    same here. lol

  4. someone1348
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    And by stable you mean? Could be a gömböc (google it)

  5. abtrehearn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    A tetrahedron.

  6. sritama
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    circle

  7. abtrehearn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    The tetrahedron is one, and an equally stable object in 3D is a sphere whose material , even if flexible, does not stretch or shrink in response to compressive or tensile loads.

  8. abtrehearn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ... is a spherical shell ...

  9. someone1348
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    The term "stable" is still pretty vague. What do you mean by it? Something that remains still? A wing is actually pretty stable when you're flying, too! Be precise!

  10. abtrehearn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Perhaps a better term would be "rigid"'

  11. abtrehearn
    • 3 years ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    With that in mind, suppose you have six beams, all the same length. You form a ragular tetrahedton with the six beams. The result is rigidity, even if the joints are flexible. Suppose you can form the surface of a sphere using flexible material thae does not stretch or shrink shen subjected to compressive or tensile forces. That shell is also rigid.

  12. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Ask a Question
Find more explanations on OpenStudy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.