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sritama

  • 4 years ago

what is space-time singularity?

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  1. manoranjan
    • 4 years ago
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    something quite like pinching the space time fabric!

  2. sritama
    • 4 years ago
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    it is related to BLACK-HOLE

  3. Jhouser
    • 4 years ago
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    Space is the dimensions 1, 2 and 3. That is Length, Height and Depth - a 3 axis graph. Time is the 4th Dimension. A space-time singularity is where all four dimensions begin to break down because of lots of matter being condensed into a very tiny space (near the Planck length). Essentially the area of an object is near zero, but contains a lot of mass. Because of this, massive gravitation is created around a very small space. This is a black hole.

  4. JonnyMcA
    • 4 years ago
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    a space time singularity is a point in space-time where an infinity occurs (that is to say there is a discontinuity in the mathematical function that describes space-time). In the case of black holes, the infinity arises in a finite amount of mass \((M)\) being squeezed into a volume \((V)\) of zero size, meaning that the density of the object become infinite. Recall that density is given my \[D=\frac{M}{V}\] and hence, you will be dividing by zero on the bottom line. If you plotted density as a function of volume for a given mass, you would find that at V=0, a mathematical singularity is found. Since density governs the degree of space time warpage, an infinite amount of mass will warp space time by an infinite amount, meaning that a space-time singularity is formed.

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