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03906574

  • 4 years ago

simplify 1/2 into -1

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  1. lizzie712
    • 4 years ago
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    Is this possible? Have you missed out an x?

  2. 03906574
    • 4 years ago
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    well, this expression reads like this, the 1/2 is in a parenthesis and the -1 is an exponent of it outside the paranthesis

  3. lizzie712
    • 4 years ago
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    You mean like \[(1/2)^{-1}\]?

  4. 03906574
    • 4 years ago
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    Yes

  5. lizzie712
    • 4 years ago
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    Ok. Well, a negative integer exponent can be written, thus: \[a ^{-n}= 1/a^n\] So, \[(1/2)^{-1} = 1/(1/2)\] which will be 2. Hope this helps you understand it a little better.

  6. 03906574
    • 4 years ago
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    You know, I am not sure of how to type the exponents into this area so I will just write the problem for you. I hope you understand. What about simplifying an X with an exponent of 2 by a X with an exponent of 3. Oh, by the way thank you for the first problem, it really helps a lot. Thank you very much.

  7. 03906574
    • 4 years ago
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    see you later

  8. lizzie712
    • 4 years ago
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    \[x^2 / x^3\] If, so, then written out in a longer hand will make it easier to understand: \[(x \times x) /( x \times x \times x)\] so, four of the x will cancel out, simplifying the question to \[1/x\]

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