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ujuge321

  • 4 years ago

Find the distance between the two points (5,-3) and (-1,-6) and the midpoint of the line segment that joins the two points.

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  1. xMatt14x
    • 4 years ago
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    \[y _{2}-y_{1}/x _{2}-x_{1}\]

  2. xMatt14x
    • 4 years ago
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    plug your points into that question

  3. Outkast3r09
    • 4 years ago
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    that is your slope matt.... distance would be \[\sqrt{(x _2-x _1)^2+(y _2-y _1)^2}\]

  4. Outkast3r09
    • 4 years ago
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    mid point will be \[(\frac{x _1+x _2}{2},\frac{y _1+y _2}{2})\]

  5. ujuge321
    • 4 years ago
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    thank you very much.

  6. Outkast3r09
    • 4 years ago
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    so your midpont would be \[\frac{5+-1}{2},\frac{-3+-6}{2}= (2,\frac{-9}{2})\]

  7. Outkast3r09
    • 4 years ago
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    distance will be \[\sqrt{(-1-5)^2+(-6-(-3))^2}=\sqrt{(-6)^2+(-3)^2}=\sqrt{36+9}=\sqrt{45}=\sqrt{9*5}=3\sqrt{5}\]

  8. Outkast3r09
    • 4 years ago
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    \[\sqrt{45}=\sqrt{9*5}=3\sqrt{5}\]

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