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vegas14

  • 4 years ago

Create your own two-step equation with NO SOLUTION as the solution. Show the steps to solving the equation and explain in words why your work proves that there are NO SOLUTIONS

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  1. agreene
    • 4 years ago
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    by two step do you mean that it only has two operations?

  2. vegas14
    • 4 years ago
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    yes

  3. agreene
    • 4 years ago
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    well, the easiest way to think about this is to think of something that is undefined... 0/0 comes to my mind. So then you have to either add that to an equation or represent it as the equation. y=x+0/0 has no solutions. But, im not sure if that is exactly what they're asking for.

  4. elecengineer
    • 4 years ago
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    ^Thats not what they are asking for. something like 3x+5 = 3x+6 is what they are asking for.

  5. elecengineer
    • 4 years ago
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    If you try to subtract 3x from both sides you get 5=6, which is a contradiction, so there are no solutions.

  6. elecengineer
    • 4 years ago
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    From a geometric point of view the lines are parallel (with one line being the other line , shifted up by one unit). Parallel lines will not interest each other so there is no solution.

  7. across
    • 4 years ago
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    Just for the heck of it, throw a "... in Euclidean space..." somewhere near the end of your answer. Parallel lines intersect (possibly more than once) in certain non-Euclidean spaces. ;P

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