AravindG
  • AravindG
satellites
Mathematics
jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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anonymous
  • anonymous
??
AravindG
  • AravindG
well i hav a doubt are rockets launched vertically???
anonymous
  • anonymous
What you talking about lol?

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AravindG
  • AravindG
ya its my question help
anonymous
  • anonymous
So.. what's the question?
AravindG
  • AravindG
are rockets launched vertically
anonymous
  • anonymous
Depends on what perspective you're viewing the launch from. Because the earth spins, rockets aren't really going upwards.
anonymous
  • anonymous
no they arent
AravindG
  • AravindG
really?? but why ?
AravindG
  • AravindG
???
AravindG
  • AravindG
help
KatrinaKaif
  • KatrinaKaif
What Cowsgomoo said was accurate. If you look from the perspective in Earth, the rocket is launched vertically. But when viewing it from Space, the rocket appears to be escaping Earth from gravity. And since Earth is a sphere, gravity pulls everything to the center of the Earth.
AravindG
  • AravindG
:( not satisfied
AravindG
  • AravindG
..........
anonymous
  • anonymous
Check the Orbital Launch section http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocket_launch "When launching a spacecraft to orbit, a "dogleg" is a guided, powered turn during ascent phase that causes a rocket's flight path to deviate from a "straight" path. A dogleg is necessary if the desired launch azimuth, to reach a desired orbital inclination, would take the ground track over land (or over a populated area, e.g. Russia usually does launch over land, but over unpopulated areas), or if the rocket is trying to reach an orbital plane that does not reach the latitude of the launch site. Doglegs are undesirable due to extra onboard fuel required, causing heavier load, and a reduction of vehicle performance.'

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