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AravindG

  • 3 years ago

satellites

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  1. becca18
    • 3 years ago
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    ??

  2. AravindG
    • 3 years ago
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    well i hav a doubt are rockets launched vertically???

  3. becca18
    • 3 years ago
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    What you talking about lol?

  4. AravindG
    • 3 years ago
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    ya its my question help

  5. cowsgomoo
    • 3 years ago
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    So.. what's the question?

  6. AravindG
    • 3 years ago
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    are rockets launched vertically

  7. cowsgomoo
    • 3 years ago
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    Depends on what perspective you're viewing the launch from. Because the earth spins, rockets aren't really going upwards.

  8. DHASHNI
    • 3 years ago
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    no they arent

  9. AravindG
    • 3 years ago
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    really?? but why ?

  10. AravindG
    • 3 years ago
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    ???

  11. AravindG
    • 3 years ago
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    help

  12. KatrinaKaif
    • 3 years ago
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    What Cowsgomoo said was accurate. If you look from the perspective in Earth, the rocket is launched vertically. But when viewing it from Space, the rocket appears to be escaping Earth from gravity. And since Earth is a sphere, gravity pulls everything to the center of the Earth.

  13. AravindG
    • 3 years ago
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    :( not satisfied

  14. AravindG
    • 3 years ago
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    ..........

  15. touchyMath
    • 3 years ago
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    Check the Orbital Launch section http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocket_launch "When launching a spacecraft to orbit, a "dogleg" is a guided, powered turn during ascent phase that causes a rocket's flight path to deviate from a "straight" path. A dogleg is necessary if the desired launch azimuth, to reach a desired orbital inclination, would take the ground track over land (or over a populated area, e.g. Russia usually does launch over land, but over unpopulated areas), or if the rocket is trying to reach an orbital plane that does not reach the latitude of the launch site. Doglegs are undesirable due to extra onboard fuel required, causing heavier load, and a reduction of vehicle performance.'

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